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Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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With the sending of résumés as easy as a click of a button, job seekers today are pulling out all the stops to make themselves stand out. Sometimes that includes embellishing their résumés.
Of 14 Department of Labor appointments requiring Senate approval, only Labor Secretary Alex Acosta has been confirmed, and the White House has submitted just five more nominations.
Allegations of rampant sexual harassment and abuse by movie producer Harvey Weinstein might create momentum to pass legislation limiting the use of mandatory arbitration agreements in the workplace.
Employees who are fired for misconduct can’t collect unemployment compensation. Generally, any action that violates a known company policy qualifies as misconduct.
The workers’ compensation system is supposed to make it easy for employees who are injured at work to get benefits. They don’t have to sue: If they can prove they were hurt at work, they receive benefits.
Three Trump administration policy reversals issued over the course of two days in early October could quickly begin affecting the HR practices of employers nationwide.

Under the FMLA, employers with 50 or more employees within 75 miles of the company’s work site are required to provide FMLA leave to their employees. But even if you're a small employer, innocent mistakes could make the “50/75 rule” meaningless to you — and force you to provide FMLA leave. Learn how to avoid that trap.

After much litigation and confusion, employers finally have an answer to whether they will have to comply with the overtime regulations the Obama administration intended to go into effect in December 2016. They don’t.

The first day of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2017-2018 term may go down as “an epic day for employers,” according to court-watchers analyzing oral arguments in a case that will likely decide the extent to which employers can compel employees to arbitrate work disputes instead of taking class-action lawsuits to court.

It’s not unusual for former employees or their prospective employers to ask for copies of personnel records. Make sure you follow a consistent policy that regulates how, when and to whom such records may be released.
It goes without saying that you must handle with care any situation in which an employee accuses another of sexual assault. Any hint that you are treating the victim less favorably than the alleged perpetrator can lead to a hostile work environment claim.
The Department of Justice has extracted the largest-ever penalty from a company accused of employing ineligible workers. Asplundh Tree Service has paid $95 million for turning a blind eye to the hiring of individuals that executives knew lacked proper documentation.
Employers generally don’t have to tolerate racially hostile or otherwise offensive language at work. But under some circumstances, you may not be able to discipline a worker’s behavior if it occurred on a picket line.
The EEOC has sued Denton County, Texas, alleging its health department violated the Equal Pay Act when it paid a female doctor less than a male colleague who performed substantially the same work.
Health care facilities are increasingly becoming targets of class-action wage-and-hour lawsuits. Alleging violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act, several recent lawsuits in Texas have challenged timekeeping practices related to meal breaks.
By 2024, nearly a quarter of workers will be older than 55, as more baby boomers and Gen Xers forego retirement.
Legislation that would overturn the National Labor Relations Board’s 2015 Browning-Ferris decision has been approved by the House Committee on Education and the Workforce.
An increasing number of employers are using small electronic sensors placed under desks that tell when employees are present.

In questioning someone, you suddenly gain power over that person ... and it's incredibly easy for that to go wrong.

Seven major trends that have significantly influenced job creation over the last seven years, according to new research from Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. Each trend has sparked occupational growth in emerging fields.
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