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Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Short-term, cash incentives continue to dominate the incentive-pay landscape among American employers, according to new research released last month by the WorldatWork total rewards association.
Immigration battles aren’t being fought only at the border. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is making good on promises to step up surprise raids and inspections of worksites suspected of harboring workers who lack authorization to work in the U.S.
Here's your monthly quiz on HR news and trends.
The owner of GT Drywall in Chino Hills, California, spent some time behind bars after a federal judge tired of his delaying tactics in an ongoing wage-and-hour investigation.
The companies that own the Bernie’s Burger Bus restaurant chain in Houston will have to pay $62,754 after investigators from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division discovered a scheme to divide workers’ hours between two limited liability corporations to deprive them of overtime pay.
A $4.4 million hit to the corporate checking account just reminded an Illinois employer that the ADA requires an individualized assessment of disabled employees’ ability to perform their jobs.
The percentage of employers offering consumer-directed health plans fluctuates dramatically.
Employers don’t have to comply with the FMLA unless they employ 50 or more employees. However, they can’t escape being covered by creating smaller, wholly owned enterprises.
It’s probably not in your best interest to jump the gun and sue a former employee if he hasn’t sued you. However, it may make sense if the former employee has initiated legal proceedings against you.
While adverse actions such as termination are classic examples of retaliation and dissuasion, other acts may also make the cut. For example, a concerted campaign to make fun of or humiliate someone who takes FMLA leave may also violate the law.
Revised musculoskeletal injury prevention regulations for hotel housekeepers take effect July 1. Affected employers have until Oct. 1 to develop musculoskeletal injury protection plans, or MIPPs.
Last year’s comprehensive tax reform bill was rushed through Congress in record time. Predictably, that meant errors crept into the legislation—and some of them have had severe consequences.
The Department of Labor and the Department of Education would merge into one agency under a Trump administration proposal released June 21. The plan was announced as part of an effort to streamline Washington bureaucracy.
Expect the decision to substantially weaken public-sector unions—which traditionally support Democratic candidates—as this ruling likely means the unions will likely see a large drop in funding.
Q. We are a large telemarketing company. We often receive customer complaints about employees who speak in thick accents. Can we refuse to hire individuals with accents for this reason?
A state court has issued an injunction exempting employers that are not based in Minneapolis from having to comply with the Minneapolis paid sick leave ordinance.
The U.S. Department of Labor has refused to help a group of Democratic senators seeking to determine the overall impact of workplace sexual harassment on the economy. Now the legislators, led by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, have turned to the Government Accountability Office for assistance.
What happens if there is an unwritten rule among supervisors that workers must come in early to set up and prepare for work before they’re allowed to log into the time-keeping system? That’s a recipe for a class-action FLSA lawsuit.
Employers are responding to today’s tight job market by offering better health and wellness benefits, according to new research released by the Society for Human Resource Management.
When an employer is found to have discriminated against a worker who was terminated, two big questions arise: whether the remedy will be reinstatement or payment of so-called front pay—the amount the employee would have earned had he not been fired.
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