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Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Ivanka Trump has long expressed interest in making paid family or parental leave a reality. Now those efforts appear to be ramping up. Here’s what we know so far.
There’s a lot for employers to like about the U.S. Department of Labor’s new Payroll Audit Independent Determination program—known as PAID. Some state officials aren’t so enthusiastic.
Sending an employee home following a dispute or workplace error with instructions to think about the event doesn’t count as a discharge—it’s a second chance. Failing to return to work afterward then becomes a resignation, thus disqualifying the employee from receiving unemployment benefits.
Where does the fight over pay equity stand? ... How should we adjust to this trend? ... What should we do now to ensure pay equity?
Three questions about overtime pay in California.
Despite many courts’ attempts to make the FMLA into the next statute where attorneys utter the dreaded answer of “it depends,” some common mistakes can be avoided.
A federal court interpreting Pennsylvania law has concluded that firing a worker for calling in a complaint to OSHA provides protection under the public-policy exception.
Public employees have a right to due process before being deprived of the property interest that is their job. Essentially, that means a public employer has to provide “some sort of a hearing” allowing the worker to present his side of the story before being fired. That right doesn’t extend to a promotion not granted.
Smart employers know it pays to appeal to millennial employees. For many millennials, one constant has defined their financial status for the entirety of their adult lives: The burden of student loan debt.
Conducting prompt, thorough internal investigations followed by appropriate corrective action may be the best way to insulate your company from potential liability when faced with employee wrongdoing.
Ivanka Trump has long expressed interest in making paid family or parental leave a reality. Now those efforts appear to be ramping up. Here’s what we know so far.
The Texas Supreme Court has decided someone on unpaid FMLA leave may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
If you have a progressive disciplinary policy that gives employees a chance to improve when they make mistakes, make sure you use it consistently. It will pay off if you follow your policy, fire an employee and the employee later decides to sue.
Under California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act, employers must reasonably accommodate disabled workers with disability leave. If that leave is then used against the worker to justify a termination, it ceases being a reasonable accommodation.
When setting promotion criteria, feel free to give educational attainment more weight than years of experience on the job. It’s your call.
Employees who have worked for their employer for a long time can be expected to know the rules and abide by them, while a new employee may not be as aware. That’s a legitimate reason to punish one employee more harshly than another. Just be sure you document the reason for differing punishments.
If an employer has a process in place for reporting wrongdoing that includes bypassing one’s supervisor when necessary, employees who don’t take that step can’t aviod punishment by blaming the supervisor. That’s not a justified excuse.
When it comes to incentive agreements, it pays to engage an experienced attorney up front to draft the language. Your early investment in legal help will save you time and money later.
Government employees have more protection from termination than most private-sector workers do. Example: They have the right to comment on matters of public concern without being discharged for doing so.
The ecclesiastical abstention doctrine essentially says that government cannot interfere unduly with how a religious organization operates. It provides protection for seemingly ordinary employment decisions that religious organizations make.
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