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Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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It is a good time to be a graduate, as employers say they are planning to hire more recent college graduates this year than they have in more than a decade, according to new CareerBuilder research.
Now is the time to start laying the groundwork on your next health insurance renewal go-round. An early start will give you a fighting chance to keep costs under control in 2019.
Supervisors sometimes say things they shouldn’t. Don’t let those minor screw-ups derail discipline that’s clearly deserved.
Here's your monthly quiz on HR news and trends.
W-2 wage statements, issued to employees, have declined slightly since 2000, but the number of 1099s has increased dramatically.
Before you rush to make arbitration agreements a centerpiece of your legal risk management strategy, understand what they are and what they are not.
When managers treat employees professionally and with courtesy, bullying will never become an issue. Here are seven do’s and don’ts.
A federal court in Texas has concluded that attendance can be considered an essential function of a job. A disabled worker who can’t make it to work with some regularity simply isn’t qualified; no amount of accommodation can fix that problem.
Ignoring a lawsuit won’t make it go away. In fact, it almost certainly means a default judgment in the employee’s favor. Be sure managers and executives understand they must take all legal paperwork seriously.
When Minnesota public employees are reinstated following arbitration of a disciplinary case, the employer may still move to prevent reinstatement under the concept of public policy interest. That’s especially true for law enforcement employees accused of using excessive force.
Maurizio’s Trattoria Italiana, a fine-dining Italian restaurant in Encinitas, California, faces charges it discriminated against a waitress because of her pregnancy.
“Vent letters” are becoming more prevalent in the modern workplace. Here are some tips to help deal with this new trend, from attorney Adam Bartrom of Barnes & Thornburg.
Could a robot do your job? Probably not, says futurist and HR consultant Josh Bersin. But software that uses artificial intelligence to facilitate decision-making will probably soon affect how you do your work.
A trustee of a benefit plan for employees of an Oakland metalworking company must serve one year of probation and make restitution for violating the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.
The nonprofit, famed for fielding a skillful cadre of dogged litigators, has just entered the employment law fray by filing a class-action lawsuit against AT&T.
Don’t have an arbitration agreement in place? Don’t expect to implement one after an employee has filed a class-action lawsuit.
It’s impossible to predict which employee will sue and why. That’s why you must carefully document every disciplinary action, including enough specific information to later justify those decisions.
When an employee sues his employer, alleging he was denied a promotion because of some form of discrimination, he must at least show that he applied for the promotion. Merely telling his supervisors that he’s interested in possible promotion opportunities isn’t enough when the employer has a formal application process in place.
To win a retaliation case, the worker would have to prove that the discipline was motivated by a desire to punish him or her for making the report. That’s unlikely to succeed if 1) the discipline began before the safety problem was reported or 2) it is clear that any other worker would have been disciplined for the same rule violation.
Employees discharged for unprofessional conduct sometimes try to blame their problems on a lack of training. They argue that they had no way of knowing that their transgressions were inappropriate. That won’t work if common sense would have told a reasonable person that their conduct was wrong.
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