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Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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It’s probably not in your best interest to jump the gun and sue a former employee if he hasn’t sued you. However, it may make sense if the former employee has initiated legal proceedings against you.
While adverse actions such as termination are classic examples of retaliation and dissuasion, other acts may also make the cut. For example, a concerted campaign to make fun of or humiliate someone who takes FMLA leave may also violate the law.
Revised musculoskeletal injury prevention regulations for hotel housekeepers take effect July 1. Affected employers have until Oct. 1 to develop musculoskeletal injury protection plans, or MIPPs.
Last year’s comprehensive tax reform bill was rushed through Congress in record time. Predictably, that meant errors crept into the legislation—and some of them have had severe consequences.
The Department of Labor and the Department of Education would merge into one agency under a Trump administration proposal released June 21. The plan was announced as part of an effort to streamline Washington bureaucracy.
Expect the decision to substantially weaken public-sector unions—which traditionally support Democratic candidates—as this ruling likely means the unions will likely see a large drop in funding.
Q. We are a large telemarketing company. We often receive customer complaints about employees who speak in thick accents. Can we refuse to hire individuals with accents for this reason?
A state court has issued an injunction exempting employers that are not based in Minneapolis from having to comply with the Minneapolis paid sick leave ordinance.
The U.S. Department of Labor has refused to help a group of Democratic senators seeking to determine the overall impact of workplace sexual harassment on the economy. Now the legislators, led by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, have turned to the Government Accountability Office for assistance.
What happens if there is an unwritten rule among supervisors that workers must come in early to set up and prepare for work before they’re allowed to log into the time-keeping system? That’s a recipe for a class-action FLSA lawsuit.
Employers are responding to today’s tight job market by offering better health and wellness benefits, according to new research released by the Society for Human Resource Management.
Unfortunately for employers, pro se litigation can take lots of time (and money) to defend. Judges are often willing to indulge employees who act as their own lawyers by providing detailed instructions on how to revise a complaint that would have been summarily dismissed had it come from an attorney.
A bill before the Minnesota legislature would establish a lower bar for sexual harassment victims under the Minnesota Human Rights Act than the one required to file claims under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.
Terminated employees often receive a severance payment in exchange for waiving the right to sue. Employees considering such an offer may feel stressed out, considering they are about to be fired. Their stress won’t invalidate an otherwise fair waiver.
When an employer is found to have discriminated against a worker who was terminated, two big questions arise: whether the remedy will be reinstatement or payment of so-called front pay—the amount the employee would have earned had he not been fired.
Job seekers are enticed by work-from-home options but well aware of the pitfalls, suggests new research from global staffing firm Robert Half.
The EEOC wants to make it clear: Regardless of which way the political winds blow, it still takes workplace harassment seriously.
A coalition of business groups is weighing in ahead of a new rule on joint employment expected to be issued later this year by the National Labor Relations Board.
An employee who makes a request for an ADA reasonable accommodation and is punished for doing so may have a retaliation claim. But she has to actually believe in good faith that the accommodation she is requesting will work.
Gone are the days when a student's summer job came with a minimum wage paycheck.
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