Overtime Labor Laws — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 3
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Overtime Labor Laws

Federal overtime laws, designed to help end the exempt vs. non-exempt debate, have made things worse. To non-exempt and exempt employees, labor laws continue to confuse.

Business Management Daily can help you comply with federal overtime laws. Learn when you have to pay overtime, and when you don’t.

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If you aren’t already geared up to respond to the Department of Labor’s new rules on white-collar overtime, you are already way behind.
The Department of Labor's update to the Fair Labor Standards Act guarantees overtime rights for many more salaried workers.
The buzz in Washington suggests the new Department of Labor rules on white-collar overtime will be released within days.
The questions surrounding who is exempt and who is non-exempt from overtime obligations under the FLSA have spurred hundreds of class action lawsuits costing employers hundreds of millions of dollars in monetary damages. Employers must struggle with understanding the different types of exemptions as well as what actions can jeopardize those exemptions, and what the overtime ramifications of misclassification can be.
Diner will pay $101,467 in back wages to employees.
A federal court has rejected a novel employee argument that an employer’s lofty sales goals and lean staffing amounted to a silent policy that required off-the-clock work.
An Orange County recycler will pay 15 workers $200,378 in back wages and damages after a U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation uncovered numerous Fair Labor Standard Act violations.
Employers can prevent an employee who receives an FLSA settlement from badmouthing them by including a nondisparagement clause in the settlement agreement.
Republicans in the House and Senate have introduced legislation to overrule the Department of Labor’s impending rewrite of the rule governing overtime pay for white-collar workers.
Suing for unpaid overtime? You have to present at least some evidence that you worked the hours you claim.
The Department of Labor has forwarded its final rule overhauling white-collar overtime to the Office of Management and Budget for review, starting the countdown clock toward possible full implementation by mid-summer.
With new Department of Labor rules on overtime pay for exempt employees coming in July, employers are scrambling to figure out how to minimize the impact.
The Fair Labor Standards Act includes exemptions for certain professions, including one for commercial seaman. Some seafaring workers have recently tried to narrow the exemption by arguing that it only applies to employees who actively navigate vessels.
If you’ve put off planning for the big overtime law changes, it’s time to take action. The final version of the DOL's revisions to the white-collar exemption rules will be released in July.
The U.S. Department of Labor’s proposed amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act will have an enormous impact on employers in the retail and hospitality industries.
Don’t make the mistake of thinking that just because an employee is paid a salary, he or she is exempt. The employer must also show that the worker performed exempt work under one of the several exemptions available under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Employers that don’t track how many hours employees work face a real disadvantage. If an employee sues for unpaid overtime, he or she will be able to use inexact estimates as proof of work done but unpaid. What’s more, should the employee win the case, those estimated hours end up doubled as punishment.

In one state, at least, they're getting very serious about the consequences of shorting employees on what's rightfully theirs.
The Fair Labor Standards Act allows government agencies to offer comp time in lieu of overtime when employees work more than 40 per week. As long as you clearly let employees know that’s how you will treat OT, they can’t complain later.
Investigators from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division have foiled a joint employer scheme they claim attempted to cheat temporary workers out of overtime pay.
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