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Overtime Labor Laws

Federal overtime laws, designed to help end the exempt vs. non-exempt debate, have made things worse. To non-exempt and exempt employees, labor laws continue to confuse.

Business Management Daily can help you comply with federal overtime laws. Learn when you have to pay overtime, and when you don’t.

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The new overtime rules for white-collar employees could force some employers to reconsider allowing part-time work for exempt staff—or to seek ways to reclassify those positions as nonexempt.
The Department of Labor’s new overtime rules for exempt employees allow employers to partially satisfy the salary threshold ($47,476 per year or $913 per week) by including up to 10% of nondiscretionary bonuses and other incentive payments in exempts’ salary. What counts as a nondiscretionary bonus?
Two efforts are already underway in Congress to block the Department of Labor’s new rules raising the white-collar overtime salary threshold.
The Department of Labor’s May 18 announcement of final rules on white-collar overtime eligibility drew swift reaction.
Could it be that so many were completely unaware that such a big change was on its way?
If you aren’t already geared up to respond to the Department of Labor’s new rules on white-collar overtime, you are already way behind.
The Department of Labor's update to the Fair Labor Standards Act guarantees overtime rights for many more salaried workers.
The buzz in Washington suggests the new Department of Labor rules on white-collar overtime will be released within days.
The questions surrounding who is exempt and who is non-exempt from overtime obligations under the FLSA have spurred hundreds of class action lawsuits costing employers hundreds of millions of dollars in monetary damages. Employers must struggle with understanding the different types of exemptions as well as what actions can jeopardize those exemptions, and what the overtime ramifications of misclassification can be.
Diner will pay $101,467 in back wages to employees.
A federal court has rejected a novel employee argument that an employer’s lofty sales goals and lean staffing amounted to a silent policy that required off-the-clock work.
An Orange County recycler will pay 15 workers $200,378 in back wages and damages after a U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation uncovered numerous Fair Labor Standard Act violations.
Employers can prevent an employee who receives an FLSA settlement from badmouthing them by including a nondisparagement clause in the settlement agreement.
Republicans in the House and Senate have introduced legislation to overrule the Department of Labor’s impending rewrite of the rule governing overtime pay for white-collar workers.
Suing for unpaid overtime? You have to present at least some evidence that you worked the hours you claim.
The Department of Labor has forwarded its final rule overhauling white-collar overtime to the Office of Management and Budget for review, starting the countdown clock toward possible full implementation by mid-summer.
With new Department of Labor rules on overtime pay for exempt employees coming in July, employers are scrambling to figure out how to minimize the impact.
The Fair Labor Standards Act includes exemptions for certain professions, including one for commercial seaman. Some seafaring workers have recently tried to narrow the exemption by arguing that it only applies to employees who actively navigate vessels.
If you’ve put off planning for the big overtime law changes, it’s time to take action. The final version of the DOL's revisions to the white-collar exemption rules will be released in July.
The U.S. Department of Labor’s proposed amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act will have an enormous impact on employers in the retail and hospitality industries.
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