Maternity Leave Laws — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 5
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Maternity Leave Laws

Need a sample maternity leave policy? Information on pregnancy disability leave? We can help with the latest on topics like disability maternity leave.

Creating a legally compliant maternity leave policy is harder than ever. When you need assistance, trust Business Management Daily to help you deliver.

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Think if someone complains to HR and you just kick it up the chain of command, the problem will just take care of itself? Think again.
Employers can read any e-mails sent using company-owned computers or other devices, as long as they inform employees they should have no expectation the communication is confidential. That’s true even of e-mails an employee sends to an attorney to discuss a potential lawsuit against the employer.
Some old-school managers cling to outdated notions about how to treat pregnant employees. Kind gestures are fine, but watch out if a manager’s overprotectiveness results in women being denied promotions or opportunities to work when there’s no reason not to.
Wayne-based Crothall Healthcare will pay more than $88,000 to settle a pregnancy discrimination claim brought on behalf of an employee working in Arkansas.
Some old-school managers cling to outdated notions about how to treat pregnant employees. Watch out if over-protectiveness results in women being denied an opportunity to work when there’s no reason not to.
In late 2010 the EEOC produced regulations on the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA). The regulations provide employers with specific guidance concerning what information they may gather about their employees, how GINA interacts with the FMLA medical certification process and how any genetic information the employer obtains is to be treated.
A triple-whammy of forces—new laws, new EEOC outreach programs and ongoing economic malaise—helped push the number of employee job discrimination claims to the highest annual total in the EEOC’s 45-year history.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act protects women against discrimination because they’re about to have a baby. But the PDA doesn’t grant any special, additional rights to time off for child care. Unless the mother has FMLA or other leave available, there’s no requirement for an employer to accommodate her child care needs.

The EEOC has sued an East Texas health care company for firing a housekeeper after learning she was pregnant. The federal agency sued Murphy Healthcare, which operates Frankston Healthcare Center, for firing Myesha Kerr, allegedly because it was concerned that she would be required to perform heavy lifting and be exposed to toxic chemicals.

You expect workers to get to work on time. Sure, occasional problems with traffic or family issues sometimes make people late. But chronic tardiness is another thing altogether...
Besides implied contracts, federal laws, state statutes and court decisions are chiseling away at the at-will doctrine as the number of wrongful-discharge suits spirals higher. Here’s why:

Last year, U.S. employees filed the second highest number of EEOC complaints claiming they suffered discrimination at work. You know that U.S. anti-discrimination laws require treating all applicants and employees equally. But do your organization’s supervisors understand the relevant laws? Pass along this primer on federal anti-bias laws to make sure your compliance efforts start right on the front line.

Q. One of our salaried employees was picked for a grand jury. She’ll be away about one week per month. Do we have to pay her during jury duty? She will be checking in via BlackBerry daily.

Terminating someone who is pregnant or who just gave birth can be dangerous. If you must fire her, make sure you can provide clear and consistent reasons. Tell supervisors they should never make comments that sound as if the real reason is pregnancy.

A Cincinnati Pizza Hut franchisee, the Twins Group, has settled a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit that alleged the company illegally inquired about a female employee’s health, shared her confidential medical information with co-workers, reduced her hours and ultimately terminated her because she was pregnant. One of several problems: She wasn’t pregnant.

Courts are starting to toss out lawsuits brought by employees who quit at the first sign of trouble without at least trying to work out a solution. Judges aren’t as willing as they were in the past to accept quitting as just another form of termination. Instead, they seem to be telling employees they need to give their employers a chance to fix problems before resorting to litigation.

Some ideas die hard—such as the belief that pregnant women can’t work in what some consider dangerous or strenuous jobs. If you make assignment decisions based on that mistaken belief instead of real medical information, you could end up in court.

When polls open nationwide next Tuesday for the 2010 mid-term elections, chances are, some of your employees will want to take part of the day off to cast their ballots. Must you let them? In most states, yes. Here's our state-by-state guide to voting leave laws.

Ruling against the Ohio Civil Rights Commission, the Ohio Supreme Court has ruled that a nursing home’s policy of requiring one year of service before providing maternity leave did not violate state law.
A Morris County police officer is suing the county for lost wages stemming from a restriction against firing guns during her pregnancy.
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