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HR Management

Strategic human resource management is the end product of success in conduction workplace investigations, vendor management, human capital management, and more.

Our human resource management articles can help you vastly improve your human resources planning, HR policies, and human resource training.

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Good employers discipline everyone who violates work rules, without regard for protected characteristics. That may seem obvious, but sometimes supervisors get sloppy and decide that a particular employee should be punished for a violation another employee got away with.

When investigating sexual harass­­­ment, make sure you document every interview, including any with the alleged harasser. That way, if you end up discharging the alleged harasser, you minimize the chances that he might win a defamation lawsuit against your organization.

An employee who was fired for reporting improper asbestos removal procedures at a Gloverville, N.Y. school worksite in 2010 has been awarded $173,794 in damages.

The Trump administration’s Department of Labor is aggressively going after employers that fire workers who report alleged workplace safety violations. It’s one reason to seek expert legal advice before disciplining any potential whistleblower—even for behavior or poor work performance that seems unrelated to any safety report.

Appeals can be time consuming and expensive, adding huge costs to defending against what might seem, on their face, to be frivolous allegations. One federal court has now said enough is enough.

If an aggrieved employee launches a social media campaign against your organization, it can be hard to figure out how to respond. However, you can defend yourself. If it’s worded carefully, your response won’t add fuel to the legal fire that comes in the wake of an employee’s lawsuit.

When an employer responds to a complaint with an investigation and almost immediately fixes the problem, the lawsuit probably won’t go far.

It’s not unusual for a disappointed employee to immediately allege some form of discrimination or bring up past discrimination complaints and claim the poor review was retaliation. Smart employers know how to protect against this sort of lawsuit.

Here's your monthly quiz on HR news and trends.

In Pennsylvania, case law says employers should balance an employee’s privacy interests against the need for random drug testing.

If an employee breaks your work rules, you should absolutely discipline him. However, make sure that discipline matches punishment you have dished out to other employees for similar infractions—and that you have records to back up your defense.

The former superintendent of the Shakopee Public Schools in Minnesota faces felony charges that he paid for more than $73,600 in personal expenses using the school district’s credit card.

Citing the risk to patients at its 15 hospitals and 75 clinics, Essentia required employees to get vaccinated or provide documentation substantiating medical or religious objections to the inoculations.

According to a new CareerBuilder survey, companies last year lost an average of $14,900 every time they made a hiring mistake.

Acme Parts, a Brooklyn company that manufactures brass products, has agreed to pay $40,000 in penalties after a 2016 OSHA inspection revealed high levels of lead throughout the facility.

OSHA is proposing a $505,929 fine against Trade Fair Supermarkets after investigators discovered workers had been exposed to health and safety hazards at three grocery stores in Queens.

Some workers wrongly believe a disability immunizes them. If they are disciplined or terminated, they often sue. Those lawsuits will be dismissed early in the legal process if the employer takes the litigation seriously and explains exactly why the worker was disciplined or fired.

Only 28% of senior HR executives are satisfied with their organization’s ability to elevate women into leadership roles.

HR professionals should document all phone calls received from applicants or employees and include a brief summary of the outcome. That way, should someone later claim no one answered or returned a phone call, you have a way to counter the allegation.

According to a new survey, 89% of U.S. employees would be willing to trade some of their salary to work at a company whose values match their own—a big chunk of their salaries in some cases.

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