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HR Management

Strategic human resource management is the end product of success in conduction workplace investigations, vendor management, human capital management, and more.

Our human resource management articles can help you vastly improve your human resources planning, HR policies, and human resource training.

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Workplace wellness is big business, with employers spending nearly $8 billion per year to improve the health of some 50 million workers. Too bad there’s scant evidence that wellness works.

Courts don’t want to dissuade employees from filing lawsuits by ordering workers to pay the employer’s legal fees. However, that’s not the case when an employee obviously lies.

Stoltzfus Structures—an Amish-owned light construction company in Chester County—will pay $188,572 in back wages and an equal amount in liquidated damages to 47 employees.

The aggressive strain of flu currently making its way across the country is prompting experts to urge workers to stay out of the workplace if they get sick. This is excellent advice, but it is likely to lead to millions of lost workdays and billions of dollars in lost productivity.

Some HR professionals are facing a new record-keeping hurdle: employees who identify as “nonbinary”—that is, neither male or female.

About one-third of college graduates have a degree in a STEM subject—science, technology, engineering, math. Why not more?

The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health—known as Cal/OSHA—is issuing more citations to employers that violate a General Industry Safety Order requiring employers’ first-aid materials to be approved by a consulting physician.

An employee with a prior disciplinary history may deserve more severe punishment for rule-breaking than a co-worker with a clean record. However, you must document that history and the role it played in your decision-making.

More than three quarters (76%) of workers say they lack trust in supervisors who can’t tear themselves away from their smartphones during a conversation or meeting.

The stock market is soaring. The unemployment rate continues to shrink. Consumer confidence just registered a 17-year high. Yet a new survey just revealed that U.S. employees feel more financially vulnerable than they have in several years.

Citing rules against discussing personnel matters, Rochester, Minn. city officials are remaining silent concerning a $1 million payout to a 25-year veteran of the city’s police force who was disciplined after making controversial online comments about current events.

Do you offer an extended training period for newly hired workers who will be performing high-skill, exempt administrative jobs? If so, you may have to treat them as hourly workers during the training period when they are not actually performing work, but learning how to do their new jobs.

This year’s flu season is suddenly shaping up to be worse than public health officials expected. To keep your employees healthy and keep your business running smoothly despite the influenza outbreak, it pays to launch an impromptu flu awareness campaign.

In news that may spell trouble in 2018 for Minnesota employers, it appears that the state’s unemployment rate is steadily declining to lows not seen in decades.

Sometimes, a long-term and apparently successful employee may not adjust well to a new supervisor—especially if that supervisor brings new or different performance expectations about the employee’s job.

If employers lose an employment discrimination case, they end up paying the worker’s legal bills in addition to back pay and other monetary awards. But what happens if the employer wins? Don’t count on the losing side paying up.

Employers can drug test employees as part of a safety program. The mere existence of a properly designed testing program does not invade a worker’s right to privacy.

Good employers discipline everyone who violates work rules, without regard for protected characteristics. That may seem obvious, but sometimes supervisors get sloppy and decide that a particular employee should be punished for a violation another employee got away with.

When investigating sexual harass­­­ment, make sure you document every interview, including any with the alleged harasser. That way, if you end up discharging the alleged harasser, you minimize the chances that he might win a defamation lawsuit against your organization.

An employee who was fired for reporting improper asbestos removal procedures at a Gloverville, N.Y. school worksite in 2010 has been awarded $173,794 in damages.

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