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Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

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Instead of simply saying “No and goodbye,” some employers are passing along candidates they can’t use to other organizations that need them—even in the same industry. 

Sixty-five percent of executives surveyed by the Korn Ferry consulting firm believe their companies will stop asking job applicants about their salary histories, even in locations that haven't outlawed it.

When evaluating applicants, you may consider whether their current health affects their ability to do the job, but you can’t factor in old injuries or medical conditions.

While the legal requirements to retain records are complex, you're probably safe in dumping those 1984 vacation-day requests. Still, knowing which records to save or toss can be critical to your business, particularly in defending against a lawsuit.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement will “significantly increase” the number of inspections in worksite operations, according to acting ICE Director Tom Homan.
Much has been happening with immigration policy since President Trump took office, and employers would do well to keep up. That’s especially true if any of your workers are in the United States on temporary work visas or if you plan to recruit immigrant workers in the near future.
Federal law requires employers to verify that employees are eligible to work in the United States. It’s unlawful to knowingly hire anyone without authorization. But what happens if an employee’s ineligibility is only discovered in the course of investigating a workers’ compensation claim?
With the sending of résumés as easy as a click of a button, job seekers today are pulling out all the stops to make themselves stand out. Sometimes that includes embellishing their résumés.
The Department of Justice has extracted the largest-ever penalty from a company accused of employing ineligible workers. Asplundh Tree Service has paid $95 million for turning a blind eye to the hiring of individuals that executives knew lacked proper documentation.
For an applicant to sue under Title VII, she can’t merely allege that she suffered because of having a criminal record.
As part of President Trump’s “extreme vetting” directives, potential legal immigrant workers will now be required to undergo in-person interviews with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
Q. I would like to ensure that all of the individuals working for us do not engage in morally questionable behavior. Since many people show their true selves on social media, not at work, can I check the social media profiles of applicants and employees?
Q. The recruiting manager of our company is interviewing a deaf applicant for an open position. What should she keep in mind during the interview?
If your organization has created standardized, objective processes for hiring or promotion, make sure you deviate from them as little as possible. Doing so without a good, contemporaneous explanation may result in expensive litigation.
What’s the truth about lying on résumés? Almost half of workers (46%) polled by staffing firm OfficeTeam said they know someone who included false information on a résumé, a 25-point jump from a 2011 survey.
San Francisco has become the latest jurisdiction to enact a law banning employers from asking job applicants about their salary histories. The San Francisco “Parity in Pay” Ordinance will go into effect July 1, 2018. Penalties for noncompliance will go into effect a year later.
U.S. Citizenship and Customs Enforcement has issued a new Form I-9 that employers must begin using by Sept. 18, 2017. The release shines a spotlight on employers’ interaction with government agencies that enforce immigration laws.
Employers in three states—Connecticut, Illinois and Rhode Island—must comply with what may be the nation’s most unique employment-related laws. Each of those states has a “Homeless Bill of Rights” that bans employment discrimination against homeless people.
Creating a more casual dress code and doing away with cubicles may help draw the attention of some younger job candidates. But real improvement in recruiting and retaining of Millennials must go deeper, focusing on helping people build trust and connection to their work.
Job applicants want to come to work for you, but you’re not making it easy. With competition for employees hotter than it’s been in years, applicants aren’t as patient with employers with outdated or slow hiring processes.
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