Hiring — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 3
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Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

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One of the best ways to tell if applicants have the skills to perform specific tasks is to directly ask how they’ve used those skills in the past. These sample questions can help hiring managers spot 10 important “soft” skills:
As part of President Trump’s “extreme vetting” directives, potential legal immigrant workers will now be required to undergo in-person interviews with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
Q. I would like to ensure that all of the individuals working for us do not engage in morally questionable behavior. Since many people show their true selves on social media, not at work, can I check the social media profiles of applicants and employees?
Q. The recruiting manager of our company is interviewing a deaf applicant for an open position. What should she keep in mind during the interview?
If your organization has created standardized, objective processes for hiring or promotion, make sure you deviate from them as little as possible. Doing so without a good, contemporaneous explanation may result in expensive litigation.
What’s the truth about lying on résumés? Almost half of workers (46%) polled by staffing firm OfficeTeam said they know someone who included false information on a résumé, a 25-point jump from a 2011 survey.
San Francisco has become the latest jurisdiction to enact a law banning employers from asking job applicants about their salary histories. The San Francisco “Parity in Pay” Ordinance will go into effect July 1, 2018. Penalties for noncompliance will go into effect a year later.
U.S. Citizenship and Customs Enforcement has issued a new Form I-9 that employers must begin using by Sept. 18, 2017. The release shines a spotlight on employers’ interaction with government agencies that enforce immigration laws.
Employers in three states—Connecticut, Illinois and Rhode Island—must comply with what may be the nation’s most unique employment-related laws. Each of those states has a “Homeless Bill of Rights” that bans employment discrimination against homeless people.
Creating a more casual dress code and doing away with cubicles may help draw the attention of some younger job candidates. But real improvement in recruiting and retaining of Millennials must go deeper, focusing on helping people build trust and connection to their work.
Job applicants want to come to work for you, but you’re not making it easy. With competition for employees hotter than it’s been in years, applicants aren’t as patient with employers with outdated or slow hiring processes.
The percentage of employers planning to add full-time, part-time and temporary or contract workers by the end of the year is rising.
If you have employees in New York City, be aware of two new laws affecting your operations there. The first new law bars you from asking applicants about their prior compensation history. The second requires you to provide contract workers with a written agreement.
If you haven’t thought much about that stalwart of HR paperwork—the Employment Eligibility Verification, or I-9 form—this is the summer to scrutinize your compliance. That’s because the Trump administration has just released a new version of the I-9 that you’ll need to begin using by Sept. 18.
Job applicants want to come work for you, but you’re not making it easy. That’s one of the conclusions to be drawn from a new CareerBuilder.com survey addressing how the candidate experience could be improved.

Employment applications may seem innocuous, but they contain a number of minefields of which employers should be aware. In general, avoid asking applicants questions that elicit information that cannot be considered when making a hiring decision.

Nearly one-third of organizations increased their overall benefits in the last 12 months in an effort to stand out as employers of choice in today’s competitive recruiting environment.
United States Citizenship and Immigration Services is advising employers to review all I-9 forms downloaded between Nov. 14–17, 2016, to ensure that employees’ Social Security numbers are correct.
By now, managers and HR reps probably know to avoid writing anything on applications or résumés that could be interpreted as discriminatory based on race, sex, religion, age or disability. It’s also unwise to attach sticky notes that imply bias.
Seventy percent of employers use social media to screen candidates before hiring, according to a new survey by Harris Poll and CareerBuilder.com.
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