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Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

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If you have moved most of your recruiting and hiring processes online, you’re in the sights of watchdogs looking for hidden or intentional age discrimination.

Unsuccessful applicants often believe they didn’t get hired because of some form of discrimination. You had better be ready to show that the person you hired was clearly better qualified. If you can do that, chances are a discrimination lawsuit will be tossed out fast.

Six out of 10 employers surveyed by Challenger, Gray & Christmas last year said they plan to add staff in 2018.

With unemployment at a 16-year low and job hopping at an all-time high of 28% annually, every employer is in a battle to attract, engage and retain top talent in 2018. According to a new ADP report, here are the key topics HR must pay attention to this year.

If you run background checks before hiring, the information you request may limit liability for the investigating firm you use.

According to a new CareerBuilder survey, companies last year lost an average of $14,900 every time they made a hiring mistake.

Between 10% and 30% of résumés include untruths according to outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas.

When you interview with a résumé in front of you, the applicant controls the interview. You naturally find yourself referring to the résumé throughout the interview and asking questions related to that information. That’s exactly what the applicant wants.

An update on the Trump administration’s travel ban as well as information on how employers can help employees experiencing financial crises.

Informal employment inquiries can sometimes lead to failure-to-hire lawsuits. The best way to avoid such litigation is to set up a clear application process and tell all potential applicants that this is the only way they can apply.

Instead of simply saying “No and goodbye,” some employers are passing along candidates they can’t use to other organizations that need them—even in the same industry. 

Sixty-five percent of executives surveyed by the Korn Ferry consulting firm believe their companies will stop asking job applicants about their salary histories, even in locations that haven't outlawed it.

When evaluating applicants, you may consider whether their current health affects their ability to do the job, but you can’t factor in old injuries or medical conditions.

While the legal requirements to retain records are complex, you're probably safe in dumping those 1984 vacation-day requests. Still, knowing which records to save or toss can be critical to your business, particularly in defending against a lawsuit.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement will “significantly increase” the number of inspections in worksite operations, according to acting ICE Director Tom Homan.
Much has been happening with immigration policy since President Trump took office, and employers would do well to keep up. That’s especially true if any of your workers are in the United States on temporary work visas or if you plan to recruit immigrant workers in the near future.
Federal law requires employers to verify that employees are eligible to work in the United States. It’s unlawful to knowingly hire anyone without authorization. But what happens if an employee’s ineligibility is only discovered in the course of investigating a workers’ compensation claim?
With the sending of résumés as easy as a click of a button, job seekers today are pulling out all the stops to make themselves stand out. Sometimes that includes embellishing their résumés.
The Department of Justice has extracted the largest-ever penalty from a company accused of employing ineligible workers. Asplundh Tree Service has paid $95 million for turning a blind eye to the hiring of individuals that executives knew lacked proper documentation.
For an applicant to sue under Title VII, she can’t merely allege that she suffered because of having a criminal record.
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