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Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

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Q. We recently received a reference request from another company. We would like to be honest with the potential employer about the former employee’s performance issues. The employee was unreliable, did not get along with co-workers, and was always complaining to his supervisor about our business practices without any basis. Are there risks to being honest and giving the employee a bad reference?
Hiring freelancers is a great way to gain the manpower—and expertise—you need without hiring full-time employees. Follow these tips to hire a freelancer for your team:
When looking for the best candidate matches for your organization, don’t limit your options by focusing only on a list of arbitrary skills and qualifications.
According to a recent CareerBuilder.com survey, 43% of employers won’t consider a candidate who’s had short tenures with several employers. However, others point to advantages in hiring people who have worked for numerous companies.
Q. Our restaurant chain employs college students part time during winter and summer breaks. We don’t provide benefits to part-timers. What are the pros and cons of leaving them active in the system vs. rehiring them as seasonal workers each summer and winter?
Here’s another reason why the U.S. Postal Service is struggling: No one wants anyone to mail in a résumé anymore.
Does job-hopping (working for various employers for a short period of time) carry the same stigma in today’s job market? Not necessarily, according to a new study from CareerBuilder.
Document every step of the interview process for new applicants and internal candidates. Make sure the process is uniform and that every interviewee gets the same treatment.
PayScale will soon welcome college seniors and recent graduates for a month-long career “bootcamp,” designed to teach them the ropes of the business world.
Some employers enliven their onboarding process with games, quizzes and other activities that inform while they entertain. Here are some real-life examples.
Here’s another reason to create a fair, impartial and consistent interview process: Your ultimate decision on who is hired or promoted is more likely to withstand legal scrutiny if you can show that each candidate interviewed faced the same questions and that each candidate’s performance was assessed by more than one interviewer.
One of the best ways to prevent age discrimination is also one of the simplest: Make your hiring process age-blind by removing age tipoffs from your application.
Job-seekers age 18 – 24 say passion, not paychecks, will define career choices that help them achieve their version of the “American Dream.”
A new study from CareerBuilder and CareerRookie.com finds that 57% of employers say they plan to hire new college graduates. That’s up from 53% last year and significantly higher than the 44% of employers that said they planned to hire from the class of 2010.
Filling a vacant position—especially for the second or third time—can take away from other important tasks. Here's how to get hiring right from the beginning.
If you’ve hired the perfect candidate, you want to make sure the person sticks around for a while. Start off on the best foot by creating a smooth and informative orientation.
Gautam Mukunda is an assistant professor at Harvard Business School who has closely studied effective leaders. His research has led him to believe that hiring outsiders for leadership positions can often be the most effective solution. The same idea can apply to any position.
What if you suddenly discovered the labor pool had completely dried up and no one would ever apply for your job openings again?
Millennial norms are different. Here's what organizations could face as they employ the Class of 2014 and beyond.
Q. We have a manager who is really concerned about “fit” when we interview for his group. He wants to ask questions about hobbies, whether the candidate has a family and how that will affect the candidate’s ability to be at work. I’ve tried to explain that, due to discrimination laws, we should only ask questions based upon the job and its requirements, but he ignores me. What can I do?
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