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Hiring

When hiring employees, negligent hiring practices can doom the process. Learn from your colleagues’ successes – and avoid their pitfalls.

Smart interview questions, well-written job descriptions, and sharp interviewing result in hiring employees that work out well, AND make you look good in the process.

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Q. I work in the human resources department of a big company that is undergoing a cultural change. We’re going from being employee-friendly to employee-barely-tolerated. Despite the fact that we’re facing all-time low unemployment rates and increasingly high hiring standards, my boss is frustrated that I cannot replace the masses of workers who are leaving for more pleasant, desirable employers elsewhere. When I try to talk with him about the reality of the situation, he gets upset and puts more pressure on me. I am considering leaving. What should I do?
Even if you’re happily ensconced in a great job, you should never stop initiating informational interviews.
Until recent years, the first rule of smart hiring was, “Match the right skills with the right job.” But today’s managers know that attitude counts more than skill when they fill most job openings.
Is your boss lying to you?  Jump ship.
In 1983 only six firms out of the Fortune 200 were testing their workers for drugs. By 1991, 196 of these companies were doing it.
If you’re weighing whether to hire a promising job applicant, ask them to visit one of your branch offices, stores or plants and look around.
When submitting a list of references to a potential employer, don’t overdo it.
Like pesky ants, demotivators can infest your workplace and prove hard to eliminate. They rarely disappear on their own, which means you must take steps to root them out.

Are you sure about that

by on February 1, 1998 7:00pm
in Hiring,Human Resources

Many managers work well when they have all the facts. Trouble is, they may not know whether they’re operating with the right information.
When interviewing job candidates, beware of giving too much weight to factors such as race, cultural background, age, level of education, religion and so on.

Round up references

by on January 1, 1998 6:00pm
in Hiring,Human Resources

When submitting references to a prospective employer, don’t just list your old bosses.
If she promises to get back to you, ask when you can expect her call.
When presenting your résumé to a potential employer, don’t just drop it in the mail or send it on line.
If you’re selling yourself as a new hire (and it's a seller's market), you can put a gentle squeeze on employers to grant you the financial package you want.
An increasing number of states are passing laws to prevent employers from dumping current staff in favor of workfare applicants, for whom employers can receive tax credits and wage subsidies.
Walter B. Wriston is among the most influential American business figures of the 20th century.
Harvey Mackay likes to say TGIM: Thank God It’s Monday.
A handbook from the National Association of Temporary Staffing Services covers such legal issues as workers’ compensation, unemployment insurance, employment taxes and wage and hour issues
There’s an old rule of thumb that says line managers should always make 10 percent more than anyone reporting to them.
When hiring managers scan a pile of résumés, they often look for ways to eliminate applicants from consideration.
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