Firing — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 12
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Firing

There’s danger in every aspect of firing, from WARN Act layoffs and exit interviews to constructive discharge and more.

Learn how to fire an employee and sidestep wrongful termination lawsuits, with battle-tested firing procedures, and employment termination letters. At last, you can fire at will!

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The Minnesota state legislature has made significant employer-friendly changes to the veterans’ preference law that state, county, and municipal governments must follow, making it easier to terminate employees who aren’t working out.
Employees who quit their jobs for a compelling reason but who don’t give their employers a chance to fix the problem aren’t eligible for unemployment compensation benefits.
A highly compensated employee whose job duties consisted largely of training customers on how to use the software his employer sells has won a California overtime lawsuit.
No employee should ever be taken by a “You’re fired!” surprise when it comes to subpar performance.
Sometimes, the right way to handle an otherwise dischargeable offense is with leniency.
When it comes to discipline, employees aren’t entitled to the equivalent of a jury trial. It’s good enough that the employer investigated and considered the employee’s input before deciding in good faith on a course of action.

You know that employee who always seems to be filing meritless discrimination or harassment complaints? You can and should discipline that guy.

Have you ever presented an employee the option to resign or get fired? Maybe you believed you were helping the employee to graciously exit the workplace without the embarrassment of a termination.
Employers are required to take reasonable steps to stop comments that are particularly offensive. That doesn’t automatically mean you have to fire an offensive employee. You can discipline instead and hope that fixes the problem.
If you ever have to consider cutting staff via a reduction in force, be sure to consider who among your employees might feel aggrieved enough to cause big legal trouble.
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