Employment Law — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 459
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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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Employees are entitled to reasonable accommodation of their “sincerely held” religious beliefs. Employers face an uphill battle if they want to deny such requests because they doubt the sincerity of their employees’ beliefs. That’s because there’s very little employers can do to get such cases tossed out before they go to trial. End result? Lots of lost time—and lots of attorneys’ fees ...

It may be natural to want to know whether an applicant has sued former employers. After all, if past performance predicts future behavior, you probably don’t want to end up with a serial litigator on your payroll. But asking about prior lawsuits may be hazardous: You can’t refuse to hire someone just because they sued for discrimination in the past ...

Sometimes employees who are in trouble for poor performance try to protect themselves by reporting incidents that don’t come close to being sexual harassment. They figure that their employer won’t fire or otherwise punish them for fear of a retaliation lawsuit. But you can take heart: It’s not protected activity just because someone reports an incident. If—when viewed objectively—the conduct being reported seems far from harassment, reporting it isn’t protected, and the employee can’t charge retaliation ...

A retired Cocoa water worker, who lost a federal discrimination suit against the city nine months ago, filed again—this time in Brevard County’s 18th Judicial Circuit Court. The lawsuits center on three incidents in which the worker, who is black, says he was subjected to racist comments and taunted by a hangman’s noose ...

Janitors working in Miami’s Bayside Mall joined with workers from five states to fight the coercive anti-union tactics of General Growth Properties (GGP) and two of its cleaning contractors. The National Labor Relations Board has sought a rare 10(j) injunction—a federal court order reserved for cases of egregious violations of workers’ civil rights—against the companies ...

When union-organizing efforts target a business, managers usually sit on the sidelines. But managers may have sympathies with either side, and their actions could cause problems for either the employer or the union. Your best bet is to rely on professional negotiators and labor counsel ...

Chances are your anti-harassment policy includes instructions for reporting any problems. That’s not enough—you also must make sure the policy is implemented. But don’t worry if circumstances require you to veer slightly from the policy ...

Employers don’t have to be perfect decision-makers—just honest ones. That means that disciplining or even firing someone because you believed the employee violated a rule is OK even if you turn out to be wrong about the violation. Be prepared, though, to prove to a court that your belief was based on particular facts, not just guesses ...

Employers can require employees who are off work for an FMLA-qualifying illness (their own serious health condition or that of a child, spouse or parent) to provide updates on their conditions. But watch out if you have a policy that calls for termination if the employee fails to report for work when his doctor said he would be ready to return—especially if more FMLA leave is still available. Make absolutely sure the employee knows about the rule ...

Ohio is an at-will employment state, meaning that employees can be fired (and quit) for any reason or no reason as long as the employer doesn’t violate a specific anti-discrimination or other law. But employers and employees can change their relationships to a contractual one by agreement. If they do, then it becomes much harder to fire that employee without a rock-solid reason ...

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