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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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Be sure to track employee accommodation offer responses to show lack of cooperation.
A California HR outsourcing firm must pay more than $1 million in back overtime wages to hundreds of employees after a U.S. Department of Labor investigation found widespread Fair Labor Standards Act violations.
An NLRB analysis of union representation cases in the last year reveals there is now about 14 days off the time between initial filings of an election petition and actual balloting.
Merely being obese is not a disability under the ADA, a panel of the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled.
The free-speech rights of government employees got a boost April 25 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 6-2 that it’s illegal to demote or fire a public servant for supporting a particular politician.
Some federal courts may be perceived as more favorable to employees because of the demographic pool from which they draw jurors.
Drivers who deliver merchandise via interstate commerce aren’t covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act, but by the Motor Carrier Act.
A telemarketing company will have to pay $1.75 million to 6,000 employees after a federal judge ruled the company’s policy of making employees clock out to go to the bathroom violated the Fair Labor Standards Act.

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has said that a former employer may re­­ceive an injunction against a former em­­ployee who works for a competitor when the employee had signed a clear but limited agreement not to compete.
California Attorney General Kamala Harris has joined attorneys general from across the nation pressing large retailers to make their employees’ schedules more predictable.
A federal court has stricken unconscionable parts of an arbitration agreement and ordered arbitration of the remaining parts.
Supervisors must understand that they have a responsibility to stop harassment immediately and take steps to prevent it from recurring.
Instructors, especially adjuncts, often use personal cellphones to do their work. Those devices may now be subject to search by public-college employers in Minnesota under a new rule.
State attorneys general want to know what major retailers are doing to make their employees’ work lives more predictable.
The popular ride-sharing service has reached an agreement with its drivers in California and Massachusetts that preserves independent contractor status, but gives some new job protections.
Tracking an employee's discipline process from beginning to end can can head of retaliation claim
Pennsylvania workers fired after reporting safety violations may not have a common-law wrongful discharge claim if they didn’t have a specific duty to report the safety problems.
Joy Mining Machinery in Pittsburgh, has agreed to settle an EEOC lawsuit that claimed the company’s hiring practices violated the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act.
Filing a lawsuit alleging corruption or wrongdoing is, according to a recent ruling, a form of protected speech for public employees.
A federal judge has ordered a case to arbitration despite an employee’s argument that it was invalid partly because of his status as an undocumented worker.
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