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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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Employee wellness programs have become increasingly popular in recent years and they are mainly regulated under two federal laws.
Another day, another political scandal involving a politician accused of having an extramarital affair. Consider the recently exposed allegedly improper relationship between Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley and a top female aide.
Before a union election can be scheduled, the union must first obtain authorization cards from at least 30% of employees in a proposed bargaining unit.
The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 and its president, John Dougherty, have recently purchased three quadcopter drones outfitted with high-resolution cameras to fly over worksites around the city.
Don’t expect any HR-related federal legislation to pass this year.
Bad news for employers that hope arbitration agreements might limit the cost and time required to resolve employment disputes.
New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has filed suit against Domino’s Pizza affiliates and three franchisees, alleging widespread violations of state wage-and-hour laws.
One remedy for discrimination is reinstatement. However, employers should be prepared to argue against reinstatement if there are reasons unrelated to a lawsuit that it is not a workable option. Here’s how one employer did that.
In a significant defeat for small business, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on June 10 upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s controversial “ambush election” rule that critics say unfairly makes it easier for unions to organize.
Proper handling can leave room for a good worker to return to top form, but it’s important to proceed carefully, deliberately, and without favoritism.

When faced with an employee who may have a physical or mental disability, a manager's legal antenna should go up right away. The ADA requires employers to engage in an interactive dialog with employees to determine whether a disability can be accommodated. Do it wrong, and you're probably looking at a lawsuit. Here's how to handle the conversation.

The National Labor Relations Board’s new joint employer standard violates the National Labor Relations Act, according to opening briefs filed by Browning-Ferris Industries in a closely watched lawsuit that seeks to overturn a major NLRB decision.
Don’t be so sure that a lawsuit filed by a disgruntled former employee without a lawyer’s help won’t go anywhere.

If you currently engage the services of an advisor to help employees understand your side on union organizing and collective bargaining issues, get in touch with him or her and your attorney right away!

Employees can’t be held responsible for work not performed while they are out on FMLA medical leave. But that doesn’t mean employers are powerless to discipline an employee for poor performance that’s not related to the medical leave.
Federal employees have just 45 days after a discriminatory act or decision to file an internal complaint.
When you talk with employees about their performance reviews, beware of using common phrases that can unintentionally communicate the wrong message, or come across as too negative or personal. Certain phrases can kill employee morale, weaken productivity or open up the organization to a discrimination lawsuit. Avoid the following phrases...
Joined, Inc., has agreed to issue $439,000 in back pay to 58 workers following a U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation.
Employees who allege they have been retaliated against for engaging in some form of protected activity don’t have long to sue. If an employee works for a government agency and alleges that his First Amendment right to free speech has been violated, the lawsuit must begin within three years.
For several years, we have somewhat vaguely referred to the “sharing economy” when discussing such enterprises as the Uber and Lyft ride-hailing services, online errand-running brokerage TaskRabbit and ad hoc hospitality matchmaker Airbnb.
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