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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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If you use an arbitration agreement to limit litigation, have your attorney regularly review the language in the agreement. It’s the best way to avoid completely defeating the purpose of having an agreement.
The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals, which covers Minnesota employers, has come out against the NLRB’s interpretation on arbitration agreements.
If an employee sues, immediately let your attorney know if the employee signed an arbitration agreement.
The NLRB is at it again, this time overturning its own previous ruling that determined which employees can vote in a union election.

Finding an accommodation for a disabled employee is just always possible. There may be no practical way to accommodate some disabilities. If that’s the case, termination may the only reasonable option.

The U.S. Department of Labor has increased the price tag for employers that violate wage-and-hour, safety and immigration laws.
Employers can, and should, ask for appropriate medical documentation to back up requests for time off. If not received, the worker can be disciplined.
A study by the pro-union, nonprofit Century Foundation found that only 103 strikes were called in 2014, lasting an average of 35 days.
Employee wellness programs have become increasingly popular in recent years and they are mainly regulated under two federal laws.
Another day, another political scandal involving a politician accused of having an extramarital affair. Consider the recently exposed allegedly improper relationship between Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley and a top female aide.
Before a union election can be scheduled, the union must first obtain authorization cards from at least 30% of employees in a proposed bargaining unit.
The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 and its president, John Dougherty, have recently purchased three quadcopter drones outfitted with high-resolution cameras to fly over worksites around the city.
Don’t expect any HR-related federal legislation to pass this year.
Bad news for employers that hope arbitration agreements might limit the cost and time required to resolve employment disputes.
New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has filed suit against Domino’s Pizza affiliates and three franchisees, alleging widespread violations of state wage-and-hour laws.
One remedy for discrimination is reinstatement. However, employers should be prepared to argue against reinstatement if there are reasons unrelated to a lawsuit that it is not a workable option. Here’s how one employer did that.
In a significant defeat for small business, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on June 10 upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s controversial “ambush election” rule that critics say unfairly makes it easier for unions to organize.
Proper handling can leave room for a good worker to return to top form, but it’s important to proceed carefully, deliberately, and without favoritism.

When faced with an employee who may have a physical or mental disability, a manager's legal antenna should go up right away. The ADA requires employers to engage in an interactive dialog with employees to determine whether a disability can be accommodated. Do it wrong, and you're probably looking at a lawsuit. Here's how to handle the conversation.

The National Labor Relations Board’s new joint employer standard violates the National Labor Relations Act, according to opening briefs filed by Browning-Ferris Industries in a closely watched lawsuit that seeks to overturn a major NLRB decision.
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