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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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Under California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act, disabled employees are entitled to reasonable accommodations that can include job modifications and even additional time off to recuperate.
A federal judge in Texas has agreed to consolidate two lawsuits challenging the Department of Labor’s authority to issue new white-collar overtime rules set to take effect Dec. 1.
A Texas judge has issued a preliminary injunction preventing a rule from taking effect that would have required federal contractors to inform Uncle Sam of any accusations of labor law violations lodged against them in the previous three years.
A group of business associations has asked a federal court in Texas to issue a temporary restraining order to block an Obama administration rule requiring federal contractors to disclose previous labor law violations.
As temperatures in the Northeast cool and mosquitos disappear until spring, the Zika virus may no longer be on people’s minds, but it should remain on your radar.
Walmart is giving thousands of assistant managers a pay bump in advance of new overtime rules requiring overtime pay for employees who work more than 40 hours per week and make less than $47,476 per year.
It’s unusual, but sometimes a written offer of employment for a specific time period can overcome the usual presumption of at-will employment. Note, however, that other documents may stipulate that employment is at-will—and they will stand up in court.
Don’t despair if you need to fire the worker for reasons unrelated to her EEOC complaint.
Q. An employee recently complained that I was violating California’s “suitable seating law” by requiring him to stand throughout his shift. Am I required to let my employees sit?
Plaintiffs in two lawsuits challenging the Department of Labor’s new overtime rules have asked a federal judge in East Texas to issue expedited injunctions preventing the rules from taking effect Dec. 1.
If an employee complained about a supervisor’s actions, make sure the supervisor can’t manipulate the disciplinary process to punish the worker.
A new front has opened in the war to determine if McDonald’s, along with its franchisees, is liable as a joint employer for employment law violations.
When investigating an employee’s complaint of harassment—sexual or otherwise—tailor your inquiries to the facts of that case.
Even if union members quit their union, they still have the right to be represented in workplace disputes.
Three New York City beauty supply companies have agreed to pay $218,000 to 16 employees who the Department of Labor determined were cheated out of overtime pay.
It’s perfectly acceptable to periodically review ADA accommodations to ensure they still work.
Regulators see workplace posters as vital, legal documents; and employers who fail to update them may face fines.
An employee who files a complaint or returns from a leave of absence and shortly thereafter suffers an adverse employment action is likely to smell a retaliation rat. But what’s considered an adverse action?
With the new white-collar overtime rules going into effect Dec. 1, now is a good time to review the OT basics.
An effective document management system depends on knowing not only what to get rid of, but also when it’s permissible to get rid of the document.
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