• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Page 36 of 313« First...102030...3435363738...506070...Last »
The Obama administration is undertaking a long-shot effort to revive new overtime rules that appear to be on life-support.
Don’t bury an arbitration agreement in an employee handbook that includes a disclaimer stating that the handbook is not a contract.
Here are some of the most significant employment-related executive orders that could be on the chopping block.
A federal appeals court has refused to reinstate a lawsuit over whether it constitutes an illegal medical test under the ADA to force someone with a high body mass index to undergo a sleep apnea test.
A federal court has refused to entertain overturning a 5th Circuit Court of Appeals decision that says filing a counterclaim to a lawsuit or even a separate lawsuit against an employee isn’t the basis for a retaliation claim.
A list of the most significant laws affecting private sector employers in California.
Employers now have a uniform federal law to help them pursue trade secret misappropriation claims.
With the new overtime rules now blocked, what might happen next?
An employee who alleges he suffered retaliation for engaging in protected activity can still lose the case even if he proves the retaliation would have dissuaded a reasonable employee from complaining in the first place.
Sometimes, employees misunderstand what it means to be disabled under the ADA and state disability laws.
If the overtime rules aren’t upheld by January 20, they are likely dead in their current form.
The employment law cases the Supreme Court refuses to hear can be almost as important as those it decides.
In a complex case, don’t assume that because one part of the claim is clearly meritless, the whole case will go away.
The National Labor Relations Board’s controversial “persuader” rule died quietly Nov. 16.
The Congressional Budget Office is making the argument that employees who thought they were about to become eligible for overtime pay on Dec. 1 will ultimately be better off without it.
It’s not enough that an employee alleges he or she has been diagnosed with what may be a disabling condition.
Even if you believe no accommodation is possible for a disabled worker, the ADA requires you to at least consider the possibility.
Slights and on-the-job isolation are not enough for an employee to make out a case for retaliation for reporting discrimination or participating in litigation against one’s employer.
Q. We just hired a contractor for a special project. He has complained that he is sensitive to the smells in our office, which include personal fragrance, scent diffusers and “smelly” food. Since he isn’t our employee can we just tell him to put up with the odor?
With new rules set to take effect Dec. 1, some of your previously exempt employees will find themselves in unfamiliar territory: having to stop working when the clock strikes 5:00.
Page 36 of 313« First...102030...3435363738...506070...Last »