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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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The couple who owns El Calamar restaurant in Orange County has agreed to settle federal charges that they violated the Fair Labor Standards Act when they failed to pay cooks for all the overtime they worked.
Something like a schedule change that really affects an employee can be seen by a court as serious enough to warrant litigation.
In a decision sought by the United States government, the Secretary General of the United Nations has been found immune from lawsuits over employment discrimination.
The Log Cabin Republicans, an advocacy group for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender conservatives, has appealed to the Trump administration.
Remind supervisors that under the law, they can be held personally liable for wage-and-hour violations.
The controversial changes to U.S. overtime law—on hold since a Texas court’s Nov. 22 preliminary injunction—are still frozen in the courts.
The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee originally scheduled Puzder’s sit-down for mid-January, but twice pushed it back.
The IRS has begun notifying employees whose Social Security numbers have been used by someone else to get a job.
A lawsuit filed in federal court alleges that the owners of several grocery stores regularly hired and mistreated undocumented workers.
Carefully document the settlement process. Be able to prove you suggested having the employee ask a real attorney to review the proposed settlement.
Smart employers make reasonable accommodations without too much hassle, and they still keep an eye on disabled employees’ performance to make sure they’re successfully doing their jobs.
Know the new rules regarding financial inducements in employer-sponsored wellness programs.
The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear three cases addressing a perennial hot topic: Is it lawful to include class-action waivers in arbitration agreements?
When you suspect that an employee has a drug or alcohol abuse problem that is affecting job performance, be careful not to mishandle the situation.
Giving additional work to someone you want to get rid of can backfire, especially when the situation looks suspiciously like a set-up.
New York employers could be facing higher salary thresholds for exempt workers. They are also confronting a new workplace challenge: the distraction of legal fantasy sports betting.
An employee doesn’t have to tell HR about a disability to gain protection from discrimination. It’s enough for the employee to tell her supervisor.
The state of New York may be about to consider legislation that would create a system of “portable” benefits that would give independent contractors some of the advantages employees have.
The U.S. Department of Labor has filed a lawsuit to require Google to provide pay data and documents relating to employees working at the company’s California headquarters.
Grand Healthcare System, headquartered in Queens, will pay $2,006,796  to 844 employees in five locations after the company improperly classified the employees as exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act.
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