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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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Labor leaders see e-mail-based organizing as a way to reverse labor’s declining membership.
I knew a guy with a great résumé. He had technical expertise, a nice mix of job experiences and a steady work history. He interviewed well, too.
When leaving voice mail, don’t rush.
Many sexual harassment claims boil down to one employee’s word against the other’s. Without witnesses, you may not know how to proceed.
Beware of “running out the clock” on the statute of limitations of a discrimination charge.
Many small businesses are adding mandatory arbitration clauses to their routine customer contracts.
If you want to stop an in-house union drive, draft a policy prohibiting any form of solicitation on company property.
Q. I work at a software firm in San Francisco. It’s supposedly a hip company, but I’m fed up. I was promised a performance review every six months, but after 14 months I’m still waiting. And when I asked for leave to be with my wife when she had a baby, the company’s personnel person said, “We may have to dock your pay. I’ll get back to you.” She never did. The company’s CEO keeps saying that we’re in an industry with no accepted business model. But is that an excuse for running a sloppy business?
Beware of a probe recently launched by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
If you manage an office staff, you may view safety as a distant concern. But just because you operate in a seemingly benign corporate environment doesn’t mean you should ignore health issues.
When you’re presented with an employment contract to sign, don’t just dwell on the noncompete clauses and confidentiality agreements.
Dealing with an employee who longs to break the rules.
Is your boss lying to you?  Jump ship.
When an employee quits or gets fired, your corporate security is at risk.
You already know the topics you cannot discuss at work: personal disabilities, marital status, lifestyle, pregnancies and the like. But beyond these basics, there are other types of verbal slip-ups that can prove costly.
New federal rules regarding mentally ill employees have made the Americans with Disabilities Act even more complicated for some employers.
A handbook from the National Association of Temporary Staffing Services covers such legal issues as workers’ compensation, unemployment insurance, employment taxes and wage and hour issues
Executives used to sign “employment contracts” that bound them to an employer for a set number of years.
Some people may have valid reasons for missing lots of work—such as illness—and federal and state laws largely determine how you can respond. But others may simply skip out without an excuse.
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