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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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If you advertise job openings and someone does not apply, they’re going to have a hard time proving that you discriminated against them.

Summit Brewing in St. Paul is suing its former vice president of sales for providing trade secrets to a direct competitor.
A federal appeals court has decided ADA disability discrimination claims can continue even though the employee has died.
All the math adds up to one conclusion: Employers better get their pay systems right.
Retaliation passed race discrimination as the most common EEOC charge in 2009.
An employer has learned the hard way that taking draconian action against an employee who might have filed false harassment charges usually isn’t a good idea.
If you use arbitration agreements to resolve workplace disputes, make sure you can prove that the employee actually agreed to the terms.
Employees who claim their employers discriminated against them must be able to prove that they suffered some sort of action that was “adverse,” not merely uncomfortable, inconvenient or even unfair.
A dramatic reduction in the regulatory burden may be largely illusory, for several reasons.
Law school dean and former NLRB member Alexander Acosta is the Trump administration's new pick to become Secretary of Labor.
Employers that retaliate against employees who file Fair Labor Standards Act claims don’t just face the prospect of owing back pay, plus double that amount in liquidated damages. They also potentially face a damage award for emotional distress.
Unions have the right to try to organize. Employers have the right to oppose unionization.
Andrew Puzder, President Trump’s nominee to become Secretary of Labor, got a preview of the tough questioning that he was to expect Feb. 16 during his scheduled confirmation hearings.
If you fire someone because the way she dresses causes drama in the workplace, you may face a sex discrimination and harassment claim.
If you are tempted to use obscure provisions of California’s labor and employment laws to pay your employees, make sure you (and your attorney) pay close attention to the details.
Brush up on the various types of visas and what’s required of noncitizen workers.
The U.S. Department of Labor has initiated disbarment proceedings against the New York City company that holds the contract to operate the U.S. Senate’s cafeteria in Washington, D.C.
Sometimes, it’s better to settle an employee’s complaint than to litigate it. If you do, be sure to carefully document the entire process.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo has issued two executive orders designed to close the wage gap between male and female state employees in New York.
If customers or visitors becomes belligerent, a business can ban them from the premises without running afoul of disability discrimination laws.
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