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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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On Dec. 22, 2016, the Supreme Court of California ruled that California law prohibits on-duty and on-call rest periods.
An EEOC lawsuit claims Walmart violated the ADA when it fired a longtime employee with Down syndrome after the woman had a hard time adjusting to a new schedule.
South County Support Services and its sister company, Southwest Transportation Agency, have agreed to settle EEOC sexual harassment and retaliation charges leveled by a former employee.
This month brings timely reminders for busy employers that may have missed important new announcements.
Several of the nominated judge's rulings have been skeptical of granting too much power to regulatory agencies such as the DOL and NLRB.
The Department of Justice is asking for more time to file briefs in a related 5th Circuit Court of Appeals case.
President Trump has named Victoria Lipnic to serve as acting chair of the EEOC and Phillip Miscimarra to serve as acting chair of the National Labor Relations Board.
The couple who owns El Calamar restaurant in Orange County has agreed to settle federal charges that they violated the Fair Labor Standards Act when they failed to pay cooks for all the overtime they worked.
Something like a schedule change that really affects an employee can be seen by a court as serious enough to warrant litigation.
In a decision sought by the United States government, the Secretary General of the United Nations has been found immune from lawsuits over employment discrimination.
The Log Cabin Republicans, an advocacy group for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender conservatives, has appealed to the Trump administration.
Remind supervisors that under the law, they can be held personally liable for wage-and-hour violations.
The controversial changes to U.S. overtime law—on hold since a Texas court’s Nov. 22 preliminary injunction—are still frozen in the courts.
The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee originally scheduled Puzder’s sit-down for mid-January, but twice pushed it back.
The IRS has begun notifying employees whose Social Security numbers have been used by someone else to get a job.
A lawsuit filed in federal court alleges that the owners of several grocery stores regularly hired and mistreated undocumented workers.
Carefully document the settlement process. Be able to prove you suggested having the employee ask a real attorney to review the proposed settlement.
Smart employers make reasonable accommodations without too much hassle, and they still keep an eye on disabled employees’ performance to make sure they’re successfully doing their jobs.
Know the new rules regarding financial inducements in employer-sponsored wellness programs.
The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear three cases addressing a perennial hot topic: Is it lawful to include class-action waivers in arbitration agreements?
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