• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Page 3 of 30912345...102030...Last »
The NLRB has ruled that Walt Disney World in Florida did not violate the National Labor Relations Act when it withheld $1,000 bonuses from union members unless they ratified a new union contract.
Like a pride of lions flashing teeth and fangs, the California legislature is on the hunt in 2018. As has become an annual spring ritual, Sacramento politicians have once again proposed a progressive labor agenda.
Employers must have clearly defined anti-theft policies to combat the problem. These guidelines can help you implement a no-theft policy at your organization.
Supervisors sometimes say things they shouldn’t. Don’t let those minor screw-ups derail discipline that’s clearly deserved.
Before you rush to make arbitration agreements a centerpiece of your legal risk management strategy, understand what they are and what they are not.
A federal court in Texas has concluded that attendance can be considered an essential function of a job. A disabled worker who can’t make it to work with some regularity simply isn’t qualified; no amount of accommodation can fix that problem.
Ignoring a lawsuit won’t make it go away. In fact, it almost certainly means a default judgment in the employee’s favor. Be sure managers and executives understand they must take all legal paperwork seriously.
Don’t have an arbitration agreement in place? Don’t expect to implement one after an employee has filed a class-action lawsuit.
To win a retaliation case, the worker would have to prove that the discipline was motivated by a desire to punish him or her for making the report. That’s unlikely to succeed if 1) the discipline began before the safety problem was reported or 2) it is clear that any other worker would have been disciplined for the same rule violation.
The California Labor Commis­sioner’s Office has ramped up wage-and-hour compliance investigations by its Bureau of Field En­­forcement unit.
The verdict grabbed the attention of company executives: The Chipotle restaurant chain quickly tendered a settlement offer when a California jury awarded almost $8 million to a former manager.
It’s essential to respond promptly to every harassment complaint.
It’s fine to pay an hourly worker a set salary as long as it covers appropriate overtime. You may deduct from the salary if the employee doesn’t work enough hours.
Here’s a reminder that drafting employment contracts is best left to the legal experts.
The U.S. Supreme Court upholds the right of employers to require terms that include barring employees from filing class-action lawsuits.
It’s true your organization may not be liable for co-worker harassment if the harassed employee knew how to report harassment but failed to use the system. However, there can still be consequences if a supervisor retaliates against an employee who complained or threatened to complain but didn’t actually report the harassment.
Do you want to push employment disputes into arbitration, but prefer to have a state or federal court hear any trade secret-disputes? Keep those agreements separate.
Sometimes an employee discovers she may have a disability, or that it’s time to disclose one she had been keeping secret. How the employer responds to that information may prevent an ADA discrimination lawsuit—or trigger one.
Business needs or employees’ personal circumstances sometimes change, necessitating a revision of a job’s essential functions to include additional tasks or qualifications. What happens if that means the incumbent holding the job can no longer perform those essential functions—especially if she’s disabled?
Do you routinely include an arbitration agreement in your employment applications? It’s a good idea to keep copies of both, in case the employee later claims she didn’t understand what she was signing because of language barriers.
Page 3 of 30912345...102030...Last »