Employment Law — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 2
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Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

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Where an employer is located makes a difference when it comes to defeating an employee’s FMLA retaliation lawsuit. That’s because different federal courts use different standards for what an employee needs to prove to win a retaliation case under the FMLA.

When evaluating applicants, you may consider whether their current health affects their ability to do the job, but you can’t factor in old injuries or medical conditions.

Legislation repealing the broad definition of joint employment established by the National Labor Relations Board’s 2015 Browning-Ferris decision passed the House of Representatives Nov. 7.

Think a simple written employment contract precludes other oral contracts? Think again. It is quite possible in California for an employee to win an oral contract claim despite an apparent written contractual agreement that seems to preclude just that, as a recent case shows.

The House Rules Committee is fast-tracking legislation that would repeal the broad definition of joint employment established by the National Labor Relations Board’s 2015 Browning-Ferris decision.

A U.S. Forest Service biologist working in Pennsylvania claims he is being discriminated against because of his sex.

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) wants to make training to prevent sexual harassment mandatory in all Senate offices.

While the legal requirements to retain records are complex, you're probably safe in dumping those 1984 vacation-day requests. Still, knowing which records to save or toss can be critical to your business, particularly in defending against a lawsuit.

When an employee rejects a supervisor’s unwanted sexual advances, that counts as opposing discrimination for the purpose of establishing retaliation for protected activity. Essentially, saying “No!” to a harassing supervisor may be as good as reporting the incident to HR.
An individual who applies for disability benefits, asserting that she is totally disabled, can still claim she’s entitled to reasonable accommodations under the ADA. However, she will have some explaining to do.
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