Employment Law — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 10
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Employment Law

Need employment law advice? Your employee’s hungry attorney knows the latest on employment at will, reasonable accommodations, and more.

Minimize employer liability, optimize labor relations, bullet-proof your employee handbook and update your knowledge of ADA guidelines with our employment law advice.

Page 10 of 577« First...91011...203040...Last »
In court, there are no ifs, ands or buts about it: Punctuation matters.
Under the Pennsylvania Human Rights Act, employees who are actively involved in termination decisions may be deemed personally liable for aiding and abetting violations of the law.
President Trump wants to cut the Department of Labor’s budget by 21% in 2018.
It’s not an ADA violation to refuse to hire someone who obviously can’t meet the physical requirements for performing a job.
Sometimes, it pays to take the time and spend the money to have legal experts carefully review your proposed actions.
Employers can’t assume that because an employee earns more than $100,000 per year and performs some duties that could arguably be considered exempt management tasks, they qualify for the FLSA’s so-called Highly Compensated Exemption.
Just because Republicans have their hands on all the levers of political power in Washington doesn’t mean they will be able to advance a cohesive agenda.
Republican lawmakers have been advancing bills that would limit employer liability in different types of lawsuits.
If the employee never requested modifications to an accommodation, he won’t be able to claim later that the employer didn’t engage in the interactive process. The fault would lie with the employee.
USERRA extends workplace protection to those who return to work after active duty. Essentially under USERRA, those employees are no longer at-will employees; you may only terminate them for cause.
Page 10 of 577« First...91011...203040...Last »