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Employment Background Check

Our field-tested solutions are designed to assist you with employee background checks, background check guidelines and pre-employment screening.

You’ll also gain a full understanding of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, to guarantee you’re in compliance with every facet of employment background checks

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When an employee sues you for employment discrimination, it’s natural to want to learn more about the person suing you and whether he may have sued others. That information is readily available. But don’t expect that even a fraud conviction related to false employment claims will get the case tossed out ...

Q. I have received a complaint from one of my employees alleging sexual harassment by a supervisor in my HR department. I want to bring in an independent investigator, but I’m concerned I’ll have to notify the subject of the investigation. I’ve heard that the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires me to notify employees before investigating these types of complaints through a third party. Obviously, this would make things uncomfortable for the employee who filed the complaint. Does the FCRA’s notice requirement apply to a sexual harassment investigation? ...

Q. We are considering applicants for a management position, including several internal applicants. Our policy is to obtain background checks on all candidates from a consumer reporting agency. If the internal applicants signed consent forms when we originally hired them, do we need to get new consent forms from them? — J.P. ...

Q. We are getting ready to conduct an internal investigation into a series of thefts that have occurred within one of our offices. We would like to obtain background checks from some of the suspected employees, but are concerned that they may refuse to execute the necessary consent forms. Can we require them to do so? — A.K. ...

Q. I've always heard that Georgia does not require that background checks be conducted on employees, except for certain types of employees who work with children or the elderly. Our new HR director believes that background checks are required for other employees as well. Who’s right? — W.P. ...

The FBI and the CIA scrambled to defend their screening practices after discovering that one of their agents was an illegal immigrant with ties to Hezbollah. Officials at the FBI and the CIA insisted the agencies conducted thorough background checks ...

Employees who retire to avoid facing internal disciplinary charges can’t turn around and claim they were constructively discharged. That’s why employers might want to consider offering retirement in such cases as an option in lieu of discipline ...

California employers can rest easy—they aren’t liable for criminal acts their employees may undertake outside the workplace or their job responsibilities. That’s true even if the employee uses work-related materials to commit the crime, and the employer missed important clues in a background check ...

The panel that hired Dr. Jose Veizaga-Mendez as a surgeon for the Marion Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) is under scrutiny after he was implicated in nine suspicious deaths. A check into Veizaga-Mendez’s records revealed that he lost his license in Massachusetts in 2006 over accusations of “grossly” substandard care ...

The Internet lets employers can find out much more about prospective employees than they could just a few years ago. One sort of web site of interest to employers doing background checks: the government’s sex offender registries. Follow these guidelines to use that information responsibly—and legally.

No matter the size of your operation, hiring and retaining qualified and honest employees is critical. A recent study found that 36.5% of employment verifications revealed inconsistencies and 14% provided false or inconsistent information about education. That means every employer has a good reason to undertake background checks of all potential employees before making hiring decisions, particularly for positions involving confidential or sensitive information ...

Employers are legally obligated to maintain a safe work environment. When employees commit violent acts against co-workers or customers, employers can be held responsible through negligent-hiring and supervision lawsuits. Each year, roughly 1,000 people are workplace homicide victims. And research shows that killings are five to seven times more likely to occur at workplaces where guns are allowed ...

You have the right to demand a drug-free workplace, but employees also have reasonable rights to privacy. That’s why drug testing and substance-abuse prevention programs carry big-time legal risks if they’re not managed properly. Employers can safely administer drug testing before hiring someone, during a fitness-for-duty test and after a preventable accident ...

Six Flags says it probably will reevaluate its employee screening process in the wake of an attack on a teenager on park property this past summer. Three seasonal employees have been arrested for participating in the beating of a 19-year-old Marietta man just outside the park.

Q. I’ve heard that the state of Georgia can help me make sure my employees are honest, law-abiding citizens. In conducting background checks on applicants, what sort of information is available from the Georgia Crime Information Center (GCIC)? ...

No single federal law governs job applications.

More and more employers are conducting criminal background checks on prospective and current employees, and that means employers are asking tough questions about prior arrests and convictions in the application process. To avoid potential liability, your company needs to develop practices and procedures for managing the process. You need to understand applicable state and federal laws concerning background checks ...

When the Lima School District hired a new head football coach, the school conducted a standard background check, including reference checks and fingerprint screening by the FBI ...
 

The Parish of Trinity Church of New York in lower Manhattan is not liable for the sexual assault of a church member by an employee, the New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division, has affirmed ...

No single federal law governs job applications. Your biggest risk is asking unnecessary questions that run afoul of federal or state laws banning job discrimination on the basis of sex, age, race, religion, national origin or disability. But, done right, your application can be a great tool to communicate important information ...

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