Employee Benefits Program — Page 4
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Employee Benefits Program

A strong employee benefits program – including low-cost employee incentives, employee recognition programs, and employee appreciation programs – can help you improve morale and retention.

We provide employee appreciation day ideas, help you with employee retention strategies and employee benefits management

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Incentives such as prizes or lower premiums aren’t the main motivators driving participation in employer-sponsored wellness programs. In fact, most employees just want better health.
The Philadelphia Catholic Arch­­diocese has frozen a defined-benefit pension plan for its 8,500 parochial school teachers and support staff. The move comes as the archdiocese wrestles with a $150 million pension deficit.
Here’s good news to pass along to younger workers in your organization: It is possible to fund a comfortable retirement—if you start contributing to your 401(k) now and commit to doing so throughout your career.
Employer-sponsored group health plans cannot impose waiting periods that exceed 90 days after an employee is otherwise eligible for insurance coverage under a final Affordable Care Act rule issued Feb. 20 by the Obama administration.
A new Gallup poll finds that 49% of baby boomers (born from 1946 to 1964) don’t plan to retire until after age 65—if they ever retire at all.
O.C. Tanner, which creates employee recognition strategies and rewards programs for other companies, is putting its expertise to work on its own staff. The average length of employment at the company is between 12 and 17 years, with many employees sticking around for their entire careers.

Nestlé Purina Petcare’s employee benefits program offers workers a little help with their own pets. The pet food maker offers $200 to any associate who adopts or becomes a pet owner to help defray initial costs.

The Obama administration has released its 18th round of frequently asked questions about implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

HR Law 101: Since the 1980s, many employers have adopted the holistic approach to their employees’ well-being. They’ve begun sponsoring activities that encourage workers to improve their health. They see the payoff in higher productivity and lower health care costs …

You can go some way toward meeting the Affordable Care Act’s requirements that your group plan provide minimum value and is affordable by setting up health reimbursement accounts or health flexible spending accounts for employees. But according to new IRS guidance, these accounts must be integrated into your group health plan.

Employees of Boston’s Four Seasons Hotel get employee news via an in-house, co-worker-produced newscast. Every two weeks, employees put together a 10-minute show that airs on TV sets in staff areas.

Execs at Geneca, a Chicago-based custom software development firm, took a cue from the hit TV show “Shark Tank” to encourage its 100 employees to come up with innovative ideas. The competition—set up like a science fair—is called the “Innovation Challenge/Shark Tank.”

For most employers, the substantive provisions of the ACA have been implemented. But employers subject to the ACA’s employer mandate, which takes effect Jan. 1, 2015, have some complicated issues to sort out: How yet-to-be-settled nondiscrimination rules and the looming “Cadillac tax” will affect their benefits plans.
The Affordable Care Act probably won’t prompt many large employers to drop health insurance benefits, but small businesses are more likely to do so than they were last year, according to the National Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Plans.
Extra-small employers in the Washington, D.C., area are offering some oversized benefits to their tiny staffs. Washingtonian magazine gave a shout-out to five of them.
In the past four years, the cost of health care in the United States grew at about half the annual rate it did from 1990 to 2007. What accounts for the cost slowdown? Economists attributed much of the bending cost curve to the rise of high-deductible health insurance plans.

On the desk of every Benefitfocus employee is a cowbell, which the associate may ring to announce that he or she has closed a big deal—or gotten engaged or is expecting a baby. In fact, employees of the Charles­­ton, S.C.-based benefits software company spend a lot of time celebrating personal and professional milestones.

Determined to retain workers now that business is getting better? Here are several real-life examples of things that organizations have done in recent years to keep workers from moving on to greener pastures.
Most full-time employees (78%) will receive six to 10 paid holidays per year, while most part-time workers (51%) will receive up to five paid holidays per year, according to SHRM’s 2014 Holiday Schedules survey.
In an effort to control health care costs, Pennsylvania State University is requiring covered employees and their spouses or partners to provide specific health information and submit to a battery of blood tests. Other­­wise, they’ll pay a $100 surcharge on top of their health premiums.
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