Discrimination and Harassment — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 41
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Page 41 of 621« First...102030...404142...506070...Last »
When an employee reports sexual harassment that may place her in physical danger, act immediately. Do everything you can to keep the complaining employee safe. Only then should you start investigating.
Some terminated employees think that all they need to do to build a winning lawsuit is recall an offensive comment a supervisor once made. That’s not usually true.
Here’s something to remember if you find that an employee’s sexual harassment allegations have been swept under the rug, unresolved and ignored.
Usually, judges rule it’s not a reasonable ADA accommodation to not have to work for a particular supervisor. In other words, a disabled worker can’t demand a transfer away from a specific supervisor, even if that supervisor may aggravate the employee’s disability.
Employees who claim they are disabled and need an accommodation must do two things: Tell their employer that they are disabled and request a reasonable accommodation.
The fact that a supervisor may favor a subordinate with whom he is romantically linked doesn’t justify a sex discrimination or harassment lawsuit by someone who isn’t involved in the affair.

Have you or any of your organization’s supervisors ever given the go-ahead to hourly employees to work through lunch so they could leave work an hour early for a special occasion? Sure you have. Who hasn’t? But know this: Every time you do it, you’re probably breaking the law ...

Sexual harassment costs workplaces hundreds of millions of dollars annually in lost productivity and legal liability. Beyond the dollar figures, companies struggle with the bad PR that comes with it, and individuals must endure the shame.
A Virginia home-building company dragged its feet when a qualified female employee sought to be promoted to a purchasing manager, according to a lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
If you decide to terminate an older employee and hire a younger replacement, assume that you will be sued for age discrimination.
Page 41 of 621« First...102030...404142...506070...Last »