Discrimination and Harassment — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 20
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Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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When you talk with employees about their performance reviews, beware of using common phrases that can unintentionally communicate the wrong message, or come across as too negative or personal. Certain phrases can kill employee morale, weaken productivity or open up the organization to a discrimination lawsuit. Avoid the following phrases...
Many companies design succession plans so they can spot the next generation of leaders early and develop current employees to their full potential.
The University of California-Berkeley has promised to look more closely into charges its head basketball coach Cuonzo Martin moved too slowly to inform university officials that assistant coach Yann Hufnagel had sexually harassed a female reporter covering the team.
Employers are obligated to provide a work environment free of sexual harassment. They can’t satisfy that responsibility by segregating the workforce by gender, even if doing so would certainly prevent harassment.
Here’s a reminder that it’s not just women who can allege sex discrimination and a hostile work environment. Men can, too, under the right circumstances.
Disabled employees with the right kind of jobs may be entitled to work from home or another remote location as a reasonable accommodation.
Last year, the U.S. Supreme Court’s EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch ruling made it clear that to prevail in a Title VII discrimination case, the employee only has to show that a protected characteristic such as sex or religion was a motivating factor in an employer’s discriminatory decision.
No matter how unlikely you think the complaint may be, investigate every hostile environment claim, including allegations of reverse discrimination.
Merely being obese is not a disability under the ADA, a federal appeals court has ruled.
Supervisors play an important role in maintaining a harmonious work environment. However, sometimes bosses are the ones most guilty of breaching civility, by saying things that offend employees.
If you fear for an employee’s safety after he has complained about a hostile work environment, think twice before transferring him instead of the person or people who are the source of the hostility.
Make sure that you punish similar transgressions fairly and equally. That’s especially true for serious rules violations. A pattern of punishing one protected class more severely than another is sure to lead to litigation.
On May 9, North Carolina sued the U.S. Department of Justice to stop the federal government from ordering the state to set aside its Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act—the so-called transgender bathroom bill.
Employers that exercise patience and remain flexible over the long term are best positioned to win an ADA failure-to-accommodate lawsuit filed by a disabled employee.
As soon as you hear a supervisor complain that an employee isn’t performing well, start keeping detailed records of your efforts to investigate.
Retail giant Target, based in Min­ne­apolis, has become a flashpoint in the culture wars over the suddenly urgent issue of transgender bathroom use.
Sexual harassment costs U.S. workplaces millions of dollars annually in legal liability and lost productivity.
Refusing to consider an ADA accommodation can spell big legal trouble. Give disabled workers a chance to prove they can do the job.
A salacious Wall Street story illustrates the cost of bad-mouthing a former employee.
A Minnesota appeals court has given the go-ahead for an age discrimination lawsuit filed by three police officers against the city of Richfield to proceed to trial.
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