Compensation and Benefits — Page 5
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Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits topics – whether it’s minimum wage, workers’ compensation laws, or employee pay – if properly handled, can help you retain workers and recruit new ones.

Use our advice to craft independent contractor agreements that keep independent contractors – and your bosses – happy.

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If you terminate an employee who may have been moonlighting or running a side hustle, she may not be eligible for unemployment benefits. You may be able to oppose benefits because she has another source of income.
Former employees claiming Equal Pay Act violations may force employers to produce not just past payroll information, but also after-the-fact pay data.
While we wait for final regulations implementing New York’s new law mandating paid family leave, here are answers to some of the more frequently asked questions about it.
The Texas Supreme Court on June 30 threw out a lower court ruling that said spouses of gay and lesbian public employees are entitled to government-subsidized same-sex marriage benefits.
Employers with self-insured health plans should carefully monitor whether employees or their dependents using those health benefits end up suing a provider for malpractice.
Q. Our company often deducts the costs of meals and lodging from live-in employees’ minimum wages. How much can we credit meals and lodging against minimum wage in California?
Q. We are expanding out hospitality chain into California. What is the maximum tip credit we will be able to deduct from servers in California?
If it’s Monday, there must be a new plan afoot to overturn the Affordable Care Act.
A St. Paul man who once worked as the controller of an insurance company is headed to prison following his conviction for a 20-year scheme to embezzle more than $1.2 million from his former employer.
Overall, 32% of employers increased their benefits offerings in the last year. They were most likely to offer better wellness and health benefits.
A federal court in Minnesota has allowed a lawsuit to proceed based on the concept that unpaid time spent at work can be the basis for an unjust enrichment wage claim.
When New York’s new Paid Family Leave Law—which goes into effect Jan. 1, 2018—is fully phased in, eligible employees will be entitled to take up to 12 weeks of paid leave for certain qualifying reasons.
The U.S. Department of Labor will be surveying construction firms in 25 Eastern Pennsylvania counties over the coming months to collect salary data.
Defined contribution plans rule the employer-sponsored retirement realm. But surprise! A quarter of employers still offer pensions.
Employees terminated for misconduct aren’t eligible for unemployment benefits. But what is misconduct?
New York Labor Law requires employers to notify employees “in writing or by publicly posting the employer’s policy on sick leave, vacation, personal leave, holidays and hours.” If employers do so, then the written policy governs whether the employee is entitled to payment of unused leave on termination.
San Francisco’s famously employee-friendly ordinances continue to set the standard in neighboring cities.
The California Employment Development Department has launched a new “Moments Matter” public education campaign to raise awareness about the state’s Paid Family Leave program and encourage eligible Californians to use it.
Sometimes landing the best candidate requires sweetening the salary pot, paying more than the last person to hold the job earned. Before you make such an offer, consider the potential consequences.
The average number of paid vacation days employees receive increases by length of service.
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