Compensation and Benefits — Page 3
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Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits topics – whether it’s minimum wage, workers’ compensation laws, or employee pay – if properly handled, can help you retain workers and recruit new ones.

Use our advice to craft independent contractor agreements that keep independent contractors – and your bosses – happy.

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More employers than ever are automatically enrolling employees in defined contribution retirement plans such as 401(k)s, according to a new survey by Alight Solutions, an HR consultancy that recently spun off from Aon Hewitt.

While the legal requirements to retain records are complex, you're probably safe in dumping those 1984 vacation-day requests. Still, knowing which records to save or toss can be critical to your business, particularly in defending against a lawsuit.

The cost of employer-provided health care and retirement benefits, measured as a percentage of pay, varies greatly by industry, according to research by the Willis Towers Watson consulting firm.

The owners of 16 McDonald’s franchises in Pennsylvania have agreed to pay more than $1 million to settle charges they violated state law when they paid employees with fee-laden debit cards.

Five questions about COBRA and Cal-COBRA regulations.
Q. May I terminate an employee for filing a workers’ compensation claim?
Employers are entitled to impose reasonable rules in their workplaces. Workers who refuse to abide by those rules aren’t eligible for unemployment compensation benefits if they are terminated.
About one in four people (24%) covered by large employer health insurance plans spent more than $1,000 out-of-pocket on health care in 2015, according to new analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. That’s an increase of seven percentage points from 17% in 2005.
Unless planned and executed properly, employers’ emergency procedures may run afoul of many federal, state and local employment laws.
After Congress failed to pass legislation repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, President Trump decided to take matters into his own hands. On Oct. 12, he issued an executive order directing the Department of Labor to write new rules allowing employers to buy health insurance benefits for employees through multi-state, multi-employer associations.
In Pennsylvania, employment is presumed to be at-will, meaning employers can terminate workers for any legal reason or no reason at all. There is one exception, however. The so-called public policy exception provides protection from termination if an employee files a workers’ compensation claim.
Federal law requires employers to verify that employees are eligible to work in the United States. It’s unlawful to knowingly hire anyone without authorization. But what happens if an employee’s ineligibility is only discovered in the course of investigating a workers’ compensation claim?
Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act have stalled for now. A slight majority of employers want it to stay that way.
The workers’ compensation system is supposed to make it easy for employees who are injured at work to get benefits. They don’t have to sue: If they can prove they were hurt at work, they receive benefits.
Three Trump administration policy reversals issued over the course of two days in early October could quickly begin affecting the HR practices of employers nationwide.
Two years ago, Emeryville, Calif. passed its Minimum Wage, Paid Sick Leave, and Other Employment Standards Ordinance. Now the city manager has released the regulations implementing the ordinance.
Despite low unemployment, employer payrolls are expected to increase only 3% in 2018, according to recent surveys. That’s in line with pay raises employers have been handing out for the last several years. What is changing, however, is how employers are paying workers.
It’s time to answer some of the trickier questions about the interaction of the FMLA, the New York Paid Family Leave Law and the state’s Disability Benefits Law.
Leave donation programs allow employees to donate their paid leave time to colleagues who are dealing with a catastrophic illness, personal emergency, or natural disaster, allowing the time to recover while still drawing a paycheck.
The health insurance “offer rate” for all but the smallest employers increased in 2017.
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