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Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits topics – whether it’s minimum wage, workers’ compensation laws, or employee pay – if properly handled, can help you retain workers and recruit new ones.

Use our advice to craft independent contractor agreements that keep independent contractors – and your bosses – happy.

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A panel of the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on March 15 struck down the so-called fiduciary rule, an Obama-era regulation that required retirement plan advisors to always act in clients' best interests instead of recommending investments that generated broker commissions.

In a recent unemployment compensation benefit decision, the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court has concluded that participating in the “gig-economy” doesn’t necessarily constitute self-employment.

Millennial employees grew used to taking “just for now” jobs with little hope of long-term stability. Their experience should inform your benefits strategy.

Senate legislation introduced March 8 would help employees save more for retirement and encourage employers to offer retirement benefits.

More employers added these benefits offerings than any others between 2016 and 2017.

A federal court has vacated a portion of the EEOC’s wellness program regulations, effective Jan. 1, 2019.

Under the disability discrimination provisions of California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act, employers are required to offer extended leave as a reasonable accommodation for disabled employees—as long as the employee provides an estimated return date.

The companies that do the best job of managing health care costs and improving plan efficiency rely on account-based health plans, according to new research by Willis Towers Watson.

The 10,000 employees of Costco Wholesale, the discount warehouse retailer, enjoy the nation’s most generous pay and benefits, according to a survey by Indeed.com.

Tax reform legislation enacted late last year is already fueling changes to corporate America’s employee compensation and benefits programs, according to a new survey by the Willis Towers Watson consulting firm.

In December, some high-profile businesses announced they planned to give bonuses to their employees. Other companies said they would raise the minimum wage entry-level employees receive, with corresponding increases for higher-paid staff. Both strategies recognize a tightening job market. Which one is right for your organization?

How you handle disability accommodation requests may determine whether a worker receives unemployment compensation if you terminate her after she’s used up all her leave.

The Department of Labor’s Office of the Inspector General is investigating allegations that Labor Secretary Alex Acosta ordered DOL staffers to quash internal research showing that a proposed rule allowing tip pooling in the hospitality industry would cost employees $5.8 billion per year.

President Trump’s Jan. 30 State of the Union shout-out to paid family leave drew bipartisan applause but left many scratching their heads: Did he have any specific plans in mind?

When a worker receiving unemployment benefits accepts a job she isn’t required to accept because it is “unsuitable” for her training, education or ability, she can quit within 30 days and regain unemployment benefits. But simply quitting because she thinks she is going to be discharged doesn’t count.

An employee may claim her job is so stressful that she can no longer work and should receive workers’ comp benefits. That claim can succeed—if a court concludes that “abnormal” working conditions caused the stress, anxiety or depression that made it impossible for her to work. But whether work is really abnormally stressful is a fact-specific question.

The New York City Council has amended the city’s Fair Workweek Law to allow employees to make temporary changes to their work schedules for “personal events.”

The Department of Labor suppressed results of internal research showing that a new proposed tip pooling rule could deprive restaurant servers of $5.8 billion in tip income every year, according to a report by Bloomberg Law.

When you are offering an applicant a part-time position with variable hours, be sure you make the terms clear. If you create an expectation and then reduce her hours, she may be able to quit and file a claim for unemployment compensation benefits.

Cities and municipalities continue to pass new laws affecting how employers manage their workforces. Here is a look at the new NYC “safe time” leave law and Albany County’s new rules on interview questions.

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