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The HR Specialist

President Trump has declared October 2017 as National Disability Employment Awareness Month. With the theme “Inclusion Drives Innovation,” the month provides employers with a reminder that they should examine their accommodation practices under the ADA to ensure they remain in compliance.

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It’s a free country, so employees can express themselves however they want at work, right? Wrong. Only employees in the public sector—those who work for government entities—have First Amendment rights in the workplace, subject to limitations.

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Age is just a number in the workplace, suggests a new survey from staffing firm OfficeTeam. More than eight in 10 professionals (82%) polled said they would be comfortable reporting to a manager who’s younger than they are; 91% wouldn’t mind supervising employees older than themselves.

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Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act have stalled for now. A slight majority of employers want it to stay that way.

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With the sending of résumés as easy as a click of a button, job seekers today are pulling out all the stops to make themselves stand out. Sometimes that includes embellishing their résumés.

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Of 14 Department of Labor appointments requiring Senate approval, only Labor Secretary Alex Acosta has been confirmed, and the White House has submitted just five more nominations.

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Allegations of rampant sexual harassment and abuse by movie producer Harvey Weinstein might create momentum to pass legislation limiting the use of mandatory arbitration agreements in the workplace.

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Three Trump administration policy reversals issued over the course of two days in early October could quickly begin affecting the HR practices of employers nationwide.

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The first day of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2017-2018 term may go down as “an epic day for employers,” according to court-watchers analyzing oral arguments in a case that will likely decide the extent to which employers can compel employees to arbitrate work disputes instead of taking class-action lawsuits to court.

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The Department of Justice has extracted the largest-ever penalty from a company accused of employing ineligible workers. Asplundh Tree Service has paid $95 million for turning a blind eye to the hiring of individuals that executives knew lacked proper documentation.

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