Managing People at Work, Author at Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily
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Managing People at Work

Here are a couple of tips to stay on top of projects employees are working on.

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Most teams have them—members who complete their assigned tasks well enough, but never have much to say during team meetings. How do you reach these silent workers? It depends on why they keep quiet.

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Would you rehire a person who left your company and wants to come back? How do you decide if they are a good candidate? Cheryl Hyatt, of Hyatt Fennell Executive Search, offers some criteria to evaluate.

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Managers should never retaliate against an employee who sticks up for an alleged harassment victim or makes overtures to help that person’s case. Such behavior will quickly turn into a costly retaliation lawsuit.

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Just like the New England Patriots and the Philadelphia Eagles, great teams do not happen by accident. There has to be deliberate intention in investing in the team and a shared goal that is bigger than any one team member.

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One bad day can shake even the best supervisor’s confidence. Here’s where you can get the encouragement you need to put yours back together.

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Many new employees have good ideas to make things better in the workplace. A good boss will coach new employees in suggestion-making, so it’s done in a positive way that doesn’t leave the new employee as an ostracized know-it-all. Here’s what to tell them.

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Performance reviews are relatively easy to do for outstanding performers. Ditto for those who need improvement. Your trouble is with Joe Average.

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Managers are sometimes tempted to quit planning because (1) time is so limited, (2) their bosses call all the shots, or (3) goals and priorities change so often that plans are no longer applicable. Those sound like good reasons not to plan, but here’s how planning helps a manager be the best he or she can be.

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Stacey Engle, EVP of Fierce Conversations, offers some tips on how managers can address the personal concerns of employees, while still ensuring top-notch work is being done.

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The goal of mediation is to help both sides work out a solution they can live with. Here are some do’s and don’ts to follow when you set up a mediation session.

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Good training doesn’t just happen. It’s the result of careful preparation and a well-developed supervisory system.

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Your job is tell your employees what to do. Right? No, of course that’s wrong. Your job is to communicate with your employees to bring the best out of them. It’s about being positive, not bossy. Here’s how.

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The way you communicate with your people signals what importance they should attach to what you tell them. If really important things aren’t getting done in your department, take a good look at the way you’re talking about them.

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An important part of supervising is training employees to do the work—or to do it better. Here are some ways to make the training process easier and more effective for all concerned.

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There’s not always time for detailed analysis before you make a decision. But that doesn’t mean you should just flip a coin and hope for the best. Good quick decisions come from thinking ahead.

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These days it seems anybody could read what they want in just about anything they see. More so, when it comes to Halloween costumes.

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Your days are indeed dotted with small promises and commitments to your employees: from “I’ll stop by this afternoon to give you a hand” to “drop by my office later and we’ll talk about that.” Here are some tips on how to keep your word.

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Your employees have job titles. And specific duties are inherent in the title. But, often, it’s not that simple. Here are some guidelines to help you keep job descriptions in line with the actual work your employees do.

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Here are six points to help guide you when you tell an employee that you will be monitoring his work.

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