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Managing People at Work

When companies expand, very often positions are created that never existed before. Those may be a little tricky to fill because the procedures have not been fine-tuned yet by any employee. Here is some advice in trying to fill the newly minted job.

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Firing employees is part of your job. And it’s never easy. But you can make it more bearable by choosing where and when to do the job.

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The first step in formal disciplinary action is an oral reprimand. Before you take this major step, however, be sure of the facts.

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Every manager knows the importance of disciplinary documentation. But what happens if an employee refuses to sign his disciplinary memo?

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Many people who work in nonprofit organizations find themselves working alongside and supervising volunteers. When working with volunteers, keep these five suggestions in mind.

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Use the following tips to maintain your emotional distance from employees’ problems, while still remaining effective.

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Try this quiz to gauge your ability to handle pressure.

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While small talk can be a good way to connect with your employees, when you need to get stuff done, it is often tough to get away from drop-in visitors. Try these steps to get back to productivity.

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Rhonda Finniss, who leads workshops on handling anger in the workplace, offers these suggestions to help you manage your emotions.

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If you have to deal with an impatient employee who may be more focused on the next job than the current one, here’s what you can do.

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If you haven’t found the time in a long while to review your people’s performance, should you just forget about it? Not at all, but as you embark on long-overdue appraisals, keep these points in mind.

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Like it or not, your people must be able to adapt to new circumstances. Here are some tips to help you make it easier for your employees to swallow that inevitable change.

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Many organizations around the world use development plans to document their employees’ development goals by itemizing the skills they need to improve and the learning activities they should undertake. In theory this is an honorable effort, but in practice, at most organizations development plans have become just another bureaucratic exercise that consumes time and effort without producing the desired results.

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The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that by 2024 the labor force will grow to about 164 million people. That number includes about 41 million people who will be ages 55 and older—of whom about 13 million are expected to be ages 65 and older.

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If your company doesn’t have much of a written dress code, you still need to address those whose attire crosses the careless and inappropriate line. You’ll know it when you see it.
Here’s how to handle it.

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How not to avoid paying overtime.

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Just because change is a constant in today’s workplace doesn’t mean employees like it or are open to embrace it.

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Wafflers constantly change their minds and give wishy-washy answers to even the most simple fact-finding questions. To hold a waffler accountable, try these techniques.

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Every boss has a worker or two that, well, just grates on you. Learning to give a pat on the back to someone who rubs you the wrong way takes practice, but it’s well worth it.

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Here are a couple of tips to stay on top of projects employees are working on.

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