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Manager's Legal Bulletin

If they’re doing their jobs, HR and managers must periodically have “the talk” with problem employees. How this meeting is conducted can mean the difference between turning around a marginal employee and opening the organization to costly litigation.

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Proper handling can leave room for a good worker to return to top form, but it’s important to proceed carefully, deliberately, and without favoritism.

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Suppose one person on your team constantly speaks out in staff meetings, offers unrequested opinions and suggestions, comments on other people’s statements, and generally interposes himself between you and everyone else on your team.

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Conducting job interviews is one of the most legally dangerous tasks performed by managers. That’s why every question should relate to this central theme: “How are you qualified to perform the job you are applying for?”

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There are two risks an employee takes if he tries to stop robbers in the act.

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The U.S. Department of Labor has filed a lawsuit against a Georgia foam manufacturer and three of its managers for suspending and terminating employees who reported workplace hazards in violation of the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

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It can be as small as office supplies or as big as an embezzlement scheme, but your employees are likely stealing something from your company.

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While you’re wondering whether they should or should not, the fact is, they do. If you want to be more formal about it, here’s a 15-point assessment you can hand out to them.

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Employees are expected to have relatively thick skins when it comes to how their bosses treat them. They aren’t supposed to overreact and quit at the drop of a hat.

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Sexual harassment costs workplaces hundreds of millions of dollars annually in lost productivity and legal liability. Beyond the dollar figures, companies struggle with the bad PR that comes with it, and individuals must endure the shame.

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A Virginia home-building company dragged its feet when a qualified female employee sought to be promoted to a purchasing manager, according to a lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

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A woman was fired from her temporary job assignment at a medical facility and was denied a full-time permanent position because of her relationship to a person with disabilities—her toddler daughter.

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Even the savviest communicators dread awkward, tense or emotional conversations with employees. Here’s how to get through them.

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An Asian restaurant in Bartlett, Tenn., is facing a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) lawsuit after it fired two employees it believed were too big (due to their pregnancies) to wait tables.

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Michael, a practicing Rastafarian, wears a cap to prevent his “spiritual energy from escaping into the atmosphere.” He was fired from his delivery driver job at a North Carolina catering company after refusing to remove it.

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The U.S. Equal Employment Oppor­­tunity Commission filed a lawsuit against Ruby Tues­­day, accusing the restaurant chain of discriminating against male em­­ployees who applied for temporary assign­­ments to a busy Utah resort.

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A nurse, battling cancer, sought an accommodation that would allow her time off for chemotherapy treatments while remaining a full-time employee. The hospital refused and fired her, according to a lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Oppor­­tunity Com­­mis­­sion.

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Costco is facing an EEOC lawsuit for allegedly failing to take steps to protect one of its female employees from the unwelcome advances of one of its customers.

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Here is some good advice for managers on the lookout for sexual harassment: Don’t just keep the jocular guys on your radar. The sleazy and unwelcome conduct can come from anyone in the workplace, as Wells Fargo Bank recently learned.

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When Deborah applied for a van driver position at a supermarket, the store manager told her he would not hire a woman for the job out of concern that a female driver would be at greater risk of being assaulted on the job than a male driver …

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