Kevin Eikenberry — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 4
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Kevin Eikenberry

While we all go to lots of meetings (too many?), more and more people are spending more and more time in meetings using technology, rather than being face to face with everyone. And while meetings are still meetings and people are still people, virtual meetings are different. One of the biggest challenges with virtual meetings is keeping people engaged and participating. Having led many virtual meetings, I’ve found five things that can help make a difference to increase participation and engagement, and reduce distractions for meeting participants. Let me share them with you here.

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Project management training, advice and wise counsel can be found anywhere. Fair less is written about leading projects. This short article won’t put much of a dent in the balance of that writing — project management vs. project leadership, but it will illuminate five key lessons that I have learned from personal experience, as well as coaching and observing others.

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One of our Clients is Cirque du Soleil, and I’ve learned much while working with them. Perhaps the biggest thing I’ve learned didn’t happen in a workshop or a meeting. It came to me as I watched one of the shows. And now, every time I watch another show (or watch a show again) this lesson is front and center for me throughout.

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Over the years, I’ve come to believe and have told many groups that feedback often says as much about us as it does the performance we are giving feedback about. Even if you wouldn’t go quite that far, it is safe to say that it is difficult/impossible for our feedback not to be, at least in part, about us. This fact is something we must deal with as coaches.

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We are going to make mistakes when dealing with and serving our Customers. A mistake, especially with an important person like a Customer, requires an apology. What follows applies for apologies in any part of our life, in any relationship, so please read it personally and professionally. Some of the embedded examples are each — but the steps apply broadly.

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I wrote the original version of this in 2008. Since then, I have learned a lot about expectations and the importance of them to individual and organizational achievement. When I read the earlier version of what follows (before I edited and hopefully improved it), I thought it would be a great thing to post here for you to read, and more importantly, for you to think about. In it, I ask some pointed questions. They are pointed for a reason — I hope you ask them of yourself and listen to your answers …

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Today I want to talk about two libraries we all have access to. One is obvious (it is coming later), and one might be more initially interesting to you. About a year ago, I had the chance to hear Emmitt Smith, the all-time leader rusher in NFL history, speak. Then, I got to meet him. I love getting the chance to listen and learn from people who have succeeded at high levels in any endeavor — there is always something to learn from them. Emmitt was no different — since his football career ended, he has built a very successful business.

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One of the most common questions I get from leaders is how to communicate change more successfully. My answer is, in part, here for you today. It relates to the John Dewey quotation in this blog post, and that means you must think about more than the change itself. You have to think about the experience of change. The fact is that everyone has experienced much change, and all of that experience isn’t positive. Yet many leaders communicate change from the position of how great it is, and all those rainbows and roses aren’t selling when people are seeing change through their less rosy personal filter. So how do we connect better, creating the commonality and community Dewey speaks of?

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I love words. They are at the foundation of our ability to communicate, and they are a significant part of my life, both spoken and as a writer. As a leadership consultant, trainer and coach, I spend much of my time trying to understand the words of others and use words effectively to help them see my perspective. Words are just as important in my role as a leader — and I would say the same is true for you. Given that, let me share an observation I’ve had about a specific word, and how instructive it might be (both specifically to this word and more broadly as a communicator) for you.

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I was at my farm recently, and I was looking at the silo you see a picture of here. Erected in 1979, it was the “Cadillac” of structures of its type. Today, the entire silo business is nonexistent. The change is a story largely of the modern dairy (and to a lesser degree hog) farm. As the farms get larger and the organizations more complex, the silo can’t play a role. As big as they are (this one, 20 feet across and 60 feet tall), they just aren’t large enough. The silo business in agriculture is all but over. In the rest of the world, however, silos are alive and well in organizations everywhere. You know what I mean. There is the sales silo, the marketing silo, the manufacturing silo, the IT silo. There is also the first shift silo, the second shift silo and much more. Do I need to go on? What can we take from this situation — “real” silos losing favor, but organizational ones alive and well? Let’s see what we can see.

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