The HR Specialist: Texas Employment Law — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 96
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

The HR Specialist: Texas Employment Law

The Texas Supreme Court has ruled that an arbitration agreement presented as a condition of employment is valid even though it was initially drafted by an HR management company that no longer manages personnel matters. The court looked carefully at the arbitration agreement and concluded it was a binding contract—partly because it contained a clause that allowed the employer to end the agreement prospectively only.

{ 0 comments }

Here’s a cautionary tale if you’re tempted to throw together a quick liability release without paying an attorney.

{ 0 comments }

Freeport’s former fire chief has sued the city and the city manager, claiming he was wrongfully terminated for reporting an alleged violation of the Texas Open Meetings Act.

{ 0 comments }

Sometimes it’s hard to imagine many advantages of being a union workplace, but here’s a bit of good news: At least in some limited circumstances, working under a collective-bargaining agreement gives employers some protection against FLSA lawsuits that demand payment for time spent putting on and taking off protective gear at the beginning and end of the workday.

{ 0 comments }

Defending lawsuits is expensive, even more so if the case is being heard in some faraway city. Your staff would have to travel long distances to participate in the trial, maybe just for the employee’s convenience. Fortunately, federal courts in Texas are clamping down on such litigation tactics.

{ 0 comments }

Interested in combating potential FMLA fraud? The best way to keep employees from gaming FMLA leave is to use the law’s medical certification process. To make sure employees take only FMLA leave to which they are entitled, follow these 10 steps:

{ 0 comments }

Thirteen employees recently filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city of Dallas, claiming they were the victims of racial discrimination while working for Dallas Water Utilities. In addition to claiming that they endured racial slurs and degrading drawings, the workers say they were passed over for promotions in favor of less qualified white workers.

{ 0 comments }

Rife Industrial Marine, a Nederland company that builds oil rigs, has agreed to pay $401,355 in back wages to 567 welders and laborers engaged in offshore construction. A DOL investigation found that the company incorrectly classified some pay as reimbursements for employee travel expenses and failed to pay overtime on those wages.

{ 0 comments }

A British company recently agreed to pay about $400,000 in back overtime pay for violating Texas labor laws. Nearly 500 contracted construction and technical workers and engineers working for the American branch of Scotland-based RBG Limited accused the company of improperly compensating them under both federal and state laws.

{ 0 comments }

Recent workplace shootings in Orlando, Fla., and Fort Hood serve as powerful reminders that employers must heed signs that an employee could act out and harm co-workers or supervisors. There were 768 violence-related deaths in the workplace in 2008. Despite those disturbing numbers, many employers stick their heads in the sand. They put their assets and employees at risk by gambling that “it couldn’t happen here.”

{ 0 comments }

Page 96 of 149« First...102030...959697...100110120...Last »