• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

The HR Specialist: Texas Employment Law

HR professionals sometimes warn managers that suspending an employee without pay can backfire—even if it’s for what seem like legitimate reasons. The problem is the potential for a retaliation lawsuit if the employee has previously complained about discrimination.

{ 0 comments }

Bad news: A qualified applicant you rejected may be disappointed enough to sue. Good news: Courts aren’t going to second-guess your choice among great candidates unless it is abundantly clear that you rejected someone based on discriminatory intent.

{ 0 comments }

The EEOC has sued a Texas school employees’ union, claiming it violated federal law when it fired two black organizers because of their race.

{ 0 comments }

Carolina Creek Christian Camp in Huntsville has agreed to pay $70,000 to settle a pregnancy and disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the EEOC on behalf of a former employee.

{ 0 comments }

While Texas law allows employers to make employees submit work-related claims to arbitration, there are ground rules. The first is that the employee must have notice that an arbitration policy is required as a condition of employment.

{ 0 comments }

Do you collect biometric data on your employees? If so, be aware that more states are regulating how you collect, store and disseminate the sensitive information.

{ 0 comments }

Public employees may have constitutionally protected property interests in their jobs and the right to due process before losing their jobs. A federal court has now ruled that using a secret algorithm to determine whether a public employee will lose her job may violate that right to due process.

{ 0 comments }

An employee who had a long history of filing internal discrimination claims has lost a retaliation lawsuit. She alleged her employer retaliated against her when it terminated her after she missed work for medical reasons, an absence her doctor believed might last indefinitely.

{ 1 comment }

When a volunteer for a nonprofit organization is “fired” from his voluntary position and the organization subsequently reports the circumstances to his actual employer, resulting in his termination, can the volunteer sue the nonprofit for tortious interference with his employment contract?

{ 0 comments }

Employment applications may seem innocuous, but they contain a number of minefields of which employers should be aware. In general, avoid asking applicants questions that elicit information that cannot be considered when making a hiring decision.

{ 0 comments }

Page 1 of 145123...102030...Last »