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The HR Specialist: Pennsylvania Employment Law

Some employees who break rules believe they’re immune from firing if someone else committed the same infraction and didn’t get fired. That’s simply not true. What may be a firing offense for one employee doesn’t have to be the last straw for every other employee. The key is to document—at the time—why you made the decision so you can later explain the difference between the two situations.

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When stress is a built-in part of the job, it stands to reason that sound mental health is a prerequisite. Someone whose psychological disorder interferes with the ability to perform such a job isn’t qualified and can be terminated.

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Child care is expensive, and many parents eager to avoid high day-care costs ask their own parents to watch the kids. That’s great if it works out. But in Pennsylvania, grandma and grandpa can’t expect to collect unemployment benefits if they quit their jobs to take care of their grandchildren.

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The Ruby Tuesday casual dining chain has agreed to pay $255,000 to a group of teenage girls who worked at its East Stroudsburg restaurant after the EEOC filed a lawsuit accusing a manager there of sexual harassment.

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Wyomissing-based industrial fastener and tool maker SFS Intec has agreed to settle an EEOC discrimination lawsuit arising at a plant in Ohio. Two Hispanic employees complained of being denied training opportunities that were open to non-Hispanics.

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Workers at nine Philadelphia area hospitals have filed a class-action overtime lawsuit claiming the hospitals’ practice of automatically deducting lunch periods deprives them of overtime pay.

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Security guards at Pittsburgh’s new Rivers Casino rejected an organizing bid by the Security, Police and Fire Professionals of America (SPFPA) union. In a close vote, the guards rejected unionization 38-35.

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Philadelphia Eagles backup quarterback Michael Vick may be back in the NFL, but the litigation continues. The Employee Benefits Security Administration discovered that pension funds in one of Vick’s companies were improperly diverted to Vick to pay his criminal restitution. Now Vick must pay $400,000.

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Employees you don’t hire can’t cause too much legal trouble, right? Wrong! In today’s tough economy, frustrated job-seekers are more likely than ever to sue. And if they sue for discrimination and win, courts are increasingly likely to award both back pay and lost future earnings …

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HWCC-Tunica Inc., a subsidiary of Penn National Gaming, is settling a lawsuit that alleged disability discrimination against a dealer at its Hollywood Casino Tunica in Mississippi.

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