• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

The HR Specialist: Minnesota Employment Law

If you have a no-violence rule, you don’t have to alter the punishment based on the employee’s personal history, no matter how tragic.

{ 0 comments }

Having rules against fighting doesn’t necessarily make it easy to punish employees when punches fly. The best approach: Figure out who did what to whom, and in what order.

{ 0 comments }

The ADA requires employers to work with employees who need reasonable accommodations. Show you did so in good faith by documenting the process. That means tracking email exchanges, taking notes during meetings and generally responding as quickly as possible. Be sure to note the employee’s actions, too.

{ 0 comments }

Sometimes, employers settle an employee lawsuit and expect that to be the end of the matter. But unless the settlement includes an agreement not to apply for any new job openings, the former employee may do just that. And if he’s not hired, he may allege retaliation for prior litigation.

{ 0 comments }

Unless you’re willing to risk losing an ADA reasonable accommodations lawsuit, don’t wait to define the essential functions of your employees’ jobs.

{ 1 comment }

Minnesotans filed 46 more discrimination complaints with the EEOC in fiscal year 2011 than they did in 2010. The 1,204 complaints represented 1.2% of all EEOC charges filed in 2011.

{ 0 comments }

For some supervisors, being a good boss is literally a hands-on job. They’re constantly patting workers on the back or wrapping them up in an innocent hug. But watch out if they’re “touchier” with female subordinates.

{ 0 comments }

Michael Brodkorb, the once-powerful Minnesota Senate staffer fired following allegations he had a sexual affair with former Senate Majority Leader Amy Koch, has filed a sex discrimination complaint with the EEOC. So far, the state Senate has racked up $46,000 in legal bills contesting Brodkorb’s suit.

{ 0 comments }

Walmart has agreed to pay $4.8 million to settle U.S. Department of Labor charges that it misclassified employees working at vision centers in the retail giant’s stores.

{ 1 comment }

In April, the EEOC issued a new Enforcement Guidance document on the use of criminal history information in making hiring and other employment decisions. In light of the guidance and the EEOC’s increased focus on discrimination in hiring, employers should review and update their criminal history screening policies and practices.

{ 0 comments }

Page 61 of 119« First...102030...606162...708090...Last »