• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Anniken Davenport

There are a few workplace scenarios in which the nature of the job makes it more likely that sexual harassment may occur. But even then, once an employer knows harassment is happening, it has an obligation to stop it.

{ 0 comments }

Pennsylvania governor Tom Wolf has signed a “clean slate” bill designed to help people convicted of nonviolent crimes obtain gainful employment.

{ 0 comments }

Employers have long been allowed to pay tipped employees less than the usual minimum wage. In some industries, tips have traditionally been pooled, so “back-of-the-house” staff can share in customers’ generosity. But the informality of tipping means it is a surprisingly complicated wage-and-hour issue.

{ 0 comments }

If a worker refuses to accept an offered accommodation, the employer is free to end the accommodations process—which may even mean the employee loses her job.

{ 0 comments }

The Supreme Court’s decision in Janus v. AFSCME struck down as unconstitutional the Illinois fair share law and similar state laws, including New York’s. This decision could be devastating for New York public-sector unions.

{ 0 comments }

The National Labor Relations Board last year overturned an established standard for determining if workplace rules comply with the National Labor Relations Act. Now the NLRB has issued a memorandum providing employer guidance.

{ 0 comments }

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals reaffirmed that former employees who are poor and struggling to represent themselves aren’t entitled to the help of an attorney at no charge.

{ 0 comments }

Be sure to warn supervisors and managers that if an employee has filed an EEOC or internal complaint or a state or federal lawsuit, deleting texts or emails related even tangentially to the underlying complaint can be risky.

{ 0 comments }

Employers that don’t keep track of hours worked may be in for a surprise if an employee quits and sues over alleged unpaid time.

{ 0 comments }

Employers can and should set reasonable standards for how employees let their bosses know they won’t be coming to work. Those rules can require calling in before the start of a shift if the employee is ill or has a medical emergency, even if it may be covered by the FMLA.

{ 0 comments }

If a worker can show that his employer willfully violated the FMLA, he has up to three years to sue. Read the recent court case that demonstrates this.

{ 0 comments }

Disabled workers are entitled to reasonable accommodations so they can perform their jobs, and freedom from harassment based on their disability. Neither of those protections means disabled workers can’t be criticized or punished for workplace behavior that breaks the rules.

{ 0 comments }

Page 3 of 3123