Is an executive assistant position really as rewarding as it seems? — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily
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Is an executive assistant position really as rewarding as it seems?

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Admins who work in a group environment may be uncertain about taking a job as an executive assistant where they’d work closely with just one person. How do you decide if the role switch is right for you?

That’s what one reader asked recently on the Admin Pro Forum:

“I’m sure the pay of an executive assistant is very nice, but I’m unsure about whether to strive for that position. I really like being basically on the same level as the other admins in the office, working very much as a group, and I’m hesitant to work so closely with just one boss, which is what this would entail in my company. I’m wondering if anyone has any reasons I should definitely go for it—or not!” —Blythe, Admin, San Diego

Readers offered their take on the issue:

If it’s fear that’s holding you back, take classes to learn necessary skills and take the plunge. That’s advice from Diana, a reader who writes that she was hesitant to take an executive assistant position but has found it very rewarding. “Almost three years later I LOVE the job,” she writes. “Yep, hard boss. But that is his personality and not who he is. I took the time to work with him, and it worked out.”

Look for chemistry with your potential boss. Request a one-on-one interview with the person you would be working for to see how it feels, reader Kate writes. “If you don’t feel the ‘it’ then gracefully withdraw yourself from consideration,” she writes. “Know your main job will be to serve this [person’s] every work (sometimes personal) related need. It is a selfless job.”

Depending on your office, you can still be part of a team. Anne, a reader who notes that she has been assisting one executive for more than 11 years, writes that “You come to the position with a network of contacts that enables you to be the go-to person for not only your new executive manager, but for your peers, as well.”

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