Salary Negotiating

Business Management Daily functions as a sort of Salary Negotiating 101 courser for how to negotiate salary.

From job offer negotiation and how to write a salary negotiation letter, we provide a salary negotiation sample as part of our comprehensive guidance you in the salary offer negotiation process.

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Question: “I’m not getting any decent salary offers during my search for a new job, so I need to figure out whether my expectations are reasonable. I do know that I'm being underpaid in my current position. I served in the military for several years and currently work for the federal government. Next year, I will complete my business administration degree.  Do you think I receive low offers because I have not yet obtained my degree or because I'm not marketing myself well?”  — Worth More Money

It sometimes takes extra money to entice an applicant to jump ship. That’s all part of the hiring dance. But there's a hidden peril that could land you in court—and cost you thousands. Learn the best practices that will help you defend yourself.

True or false: Employees are either creative or they’re not—creativity isn’t a skill you can teach. False. Managers can play a key role in creating an environment in which employees will want to look for new ideas. Share this article with your supervisors to help tap employee creativity.

In a free-market system, it sometimes takes extra money to entice an applicant to jump ship. But sometimes that causes an existing employee to earn less than a new employee who holds the same job. If that existing employee belongs to a protected class, she may fire off a pay discrimination claim. That’s when interview notes documenting the salary negotiations come in handy.

Move over, Google. Microsoft grabs tech headlines this month by adding zippy new features to its Internet Explorer browser. Here are four cool tricks that will save time for you and your employees.

We all understand that in a free-market system, it sometimes takes extra money to induce an applicant to leave one job for another. That’s all part of the hiring dance. But sometimes the end result is that an existing employee ends up earning less than a new employee who holds the same or a similar job and may sue for discrimination.

Soon after Gary Lizalek was hired at a Wisconsin medical firm, he informed the company that he believed, as a matter of religious faith, that he was three separate beings. The company fired all three Lizaleks. He sued, saying the company failed to accommodate his religious beliefs.

You probably know how to make a case for a raise: by touting the tangible ways in which you’ve added value to the company. But once you’ve asked your boss, he or she will probably respond in one of three ways. Here’s how to handle each possible response and move the conversation toward your ultimate goal: getting a raise.

More pink slips are on the horizon. According to outplacement firm Challenger Gray & Christmas, 1 million more job cuts are likely in 2009. But, there's a silver lining among all the dark clouds of this recession, says the firm's chief executive, John Challenger, and it's this: Layoffs can be good news, in a strange way.

You love your work, but you’d like it even better if you made more money. A bad job market can be a good time to get what you want—and deserve. Why? Everyone else might be too afraid to attempt any salary negotiating.

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