Salary Negotiating

Business Management Daily functions as a sort of Salary Negotiating 101 courser for how to negotiate salary.

From job offer negotiation and how to write a salary negotiation letter, we provide a salary negotiation sample as part of our comprehensive guidance you in the salary offer negotiation process.

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Elevate your business writing by ridding it of these common misuses and abuses: 1. Ill-placed question marks. 2. Cool-sounding buzzwords. 3. Clichés.

How can someone convince her boss she deserves more money, without revealing that she knows she’s being underpaid? Three steps:

Allan Stark loves to haggle. In his world, everybody can make out better on every deal. He’s made a second career by offering his negotiating skills on the web. His pitch: He’ll do even better on the very best deal you can make and then split the savings. Stark offers these tips:

It’s a golden rule in most businesses: Salaries must be kept secret. It's almost universally accepted that mayhem would ensue in the workplace if people knew what their co-workers, their managers or—gasp—the CEO was making. Three major reasons why secret salaries are silly, according to consultant Alexander Kjerulf:

If you suspect you’re underpaid, the topic is worth broaching with your boss. But build your case first. Five guidelines: 1.  Check online salary calculators. 2.  Leave co-workers out of it. 3.  Realize need isn’t a credible reason for a raise. 4.  Quantify your worth. 5.  Seek creative solutions.
Adecco’s 2011 Workplace Outlook Study asked men and women whether they thought they’d receive a raise, bonus or promotion in the coming year. More than 40% of men said they thought they would receive a raise. But only 29% of women did. What accounts for the difference?
As hiring picks up due to the firming economy, organizations want to offer competitive salaries that aren’t inordinately lower or higher than those available from competitors. Here are the most reputable web sites that track pay for hundreds of professions and specialties.

Employers are emerging from the Great Recession with a different view of compensation and benefits. And, in most cases, that’s a good thing. Lessons learned in the lean years are being adapted and modified to make organizations stronger in this post-recession landscape. Look for these 11 trends to take a firm hold in 2011:

Pay-for-performance and higher employee health care contributions look like they’ll remain fixtures of the post-recession comp and benefits landscape. Here are 11 other trends that could take a firm hold in 2011:

“I’m worried the team won’t like my suggestions.” “I’m worried I didn’t give my boss enough time between flights.” “I’m worried they’ll eliminate my position.” Everybody worries sometimes, but too much worrying becomes a mental bad habit that costs time, money and personal sanity. What to do instead? Make worry WORK for you.

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