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Salary Negotiating

Business Management Daily functions as a sort of Salary Negotiating 101 courser for how to negotiate salary.

From job offer negotiation and how to write a salary negotiation letter, we provide a salary negotiation sample as part of our comprehensive guidance you in the salary offer negotiation process.

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Employers are emerging from the Great Recession with a different view of compensation and benefits. And, in most cases, that’s a good thing. Lessons learned in the lean years are being adapted and modified to make organizations stronger in this post-recession landscape. Look for these 11 trends to take a firm hold in 2011:

Pay-for-performance and higher employee health care contributions look like they’ll remain fixtures of the post-recession comp and benefits landscape. Here are 11 other trends that could take a firm hold in 2011:

“I’m worried the team won’t like my suggestions.” “I’m worried I didn’t give my boss enough time between flights.” “I’m worried they’ll eliminate my position.” Everybody worries sometimes, but too much worrying becomes a mental bad habit that costs time, money and personal sanity. What to do instead? Make worry WORK for you.

Suppose you’re about to face off with an “old school” negotiator whose reputation for hard bargaining precedes him. There are steps you can take to transform a potential zero-sum competition of wills into an interaction that is aligned toward problem solving—even when facing the hardest bargainer.

The first rule of negotiating a raise is to make it easy for your boss to say yes. That means anticipating objections and addressing them in advance. Smart negotiators rarely say, “I want more money.” Instead, they use facts to drive home their valuable contributions. Here’s how to prepare for your next salary review:

Hold more-focused meetings... Keep emoticons out of business communication ... Find salary information for administrative positions in your area ... Save money on printing ... Avoid this grammar trap ... Receive the credit you deserve ...

Projected starting salaries for administrative professionals could see a decrease by an average of 2.2% in 2010. The good news: If you’re good at adapting to unexpected situations and able to quickly learn new skills, you’re the sort of person who will still thrive.

Question: “I’m not getting any decent salary offers during my search for a new job, so I need to figure out whether my expectations are reasonable. I do know that I'm being underpaid in my current position. I served in the military for several years and currently work for the federal government. Next year, I will complete my business administration degree.  Do you think I receive low offers because I have not yet obtained my degree or because I'm not marketing myself well?”  — Worth More Money

It sometimes takes extra money to entice an applicant to jump ship. That’s all part of the hiring dance. But there's a hidden peril that could land you in court—and cost you thousands. Learn the best practices that will help you defend yourself.

True or false: Employees are either creative or they’re not—creativity isn’t a skill you can teach. False. Managers can play a key role in creating an environment in which employees will want to look for new ideas. Share this article with your supervisors to help tap employee creativity.

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