Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

In a Robert Half International survey, employees rated “working for a stable company” and “having a strong sense of job security” as the two most important factors about their work situation. Robert Half District President Brett Good suggests that organizations should leverage that new desire for stability during the hiring process. Here are six ideas from the survey that might work for you:
You’ve had nothing but constant interruptions all morning as deadlines loom and then the phone rings ... again. Seconds later, you find yourself on the other end of a loud, complaining customer, client or colleague whose expectations haven’t been met. What do you do?

The problem of self-control goes back to Adam and Eve, says Dan Ariely, author of Predictably Irrational: We would all like to be in the Garden of Eden, but eating an apple right this moment may be too tempting to avoid. Next time you’re trying to accomplish a long-term goal, consider these two strategies for “tricking” yourself into sticking with your plan:

Hard-driving, “results-at-all-costs” executives actually diminish the bottom line, while self-aware leaders with strong interpersonal skills deliver better financial performance. So says a recent study by organizational consulting firm Green Peak Partners in collaboration with researchers at Cornell University.
Question: “I am the office administrator for a small nonprofit that shares a building (and a boardroom) with several other nonprofits. Due to scheduling conflicts, we occasionally hold a meeting off site at a board member’s office. The board member’s administrative assistant always provides invaluable help in coordinating meeting details (and sometimes goes above and beyond by staying late to make sure everything is set for our meeting), and I would like to acknowledge that help beyond a simple “thank you” e-mail. Would it be proper to send a small token of thanks (such as a gift card) to another administrative professional?” — Stacey
Each month, AdminProToday.com assembles a digestible collection of 1-minute strategies that help you save time and stress. Below are the 8 most recent time-saving tips:

You’ve either seen it or done it: You disagree with something during a meeting, but instead of speaking up, you sit there and stew. Maybe that’s because whenever an alternative point of view is raised, it gets batted down. There’s nothing wrong with disagreeing. Here are tips on managing your allies strategically, arguing professionally and making sure you have a safety net in place:

Suppose you’re about to face off with an “old school” negotiator whose reputation for hard bargaining precedes him. There are steps you can take to transform a potential zero-sum competition of wills into an interaction that is aligned toward problem solving—even when facing the hardest bargainer.

Many lawsuits result from relatively small, manageable disputes that weren’t dealt with directly, often because HR simply didn’t know what to do or feared making it worse. Kathy Perkins, one of the presenters of our webinar, "How to Resolve Workplace Conflict," offers these proactive strategies for dealing with disruptive conflict.

Strip formatting from a Word document ... Work toward a big health goal one text at a time ... Make clutter disappear by turning each piece of paper into an action item in your planner ... Avoid information overload—and save time—by asking a specific, “micro” question ... Connect with people who want your cast-offs ...