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Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Of all of HR’s priorities, keeping good employees is on top. You can be a hero in the post-recession years ahead. Act like one: Be brave enough to communicate the truth to both employees and to company execs. Assert your key role by trying the following:
As Dianne listens to her iPod, she taps out an e-mail on her iPhone and watches the TV screen—all while walking briskly on a treadmill. But Dianne might be clearer-headed if she went for a run without gadgets.
If you have employees preaching about your products or services via blogs, Twitter or other social networking sites, beware a hidden risk. The FTC has issued new Enforcement Guidelines that require employees to disclose their relationships with their employer whenever they post comments or positive reviews about their employer’s product on a social media site.
Disputes between co-workers and between employees and their bosses are almost inevitable—which is why every HR professional must know how to gather the necessary facts to find out what’s going on. Take some time to think about and plan your inquiry even for simple, seemingly routine issues. If the situation is complicated or raises a red flag about possible legal claims, a well-planned investigation can be critically important.
If you've received an invitation to a party at your boss’s home, yes, you do have to RSVP, attend, dress appropriately, mingle and send a thank-you note afterward, says Barbara Pachter, a leading expert in business etiquette and communications. And turn off your cell phone!

On average, American professionals spend 5.6 hours each week in meetings that 71% say “aren’t productive.” If you'd rather spend those hours creatively engaged, try these tips for making the most of meeting time. (You can pull off one of these even if you're not the one who called the meeting!)

Jonah’s boss always tells employees to “think outside the box.” But when they do, top executives always turn them down. How can you convince the boss to try your ideas? Start by not selling an innovative big idea. Follow these steps:

Writing and memorizing a well-researched presentation guarantees ... well-polished boredom. Build flexibility into your delivery to better connect with your audience. Use these four tactics for deviating from your script.

It’s an old bit of advice that smiling while you’re talking on the phone is one way to improve your phone demeanor. But how many people actually follow that advice? New evidence may convince you to try it. Now scientists say that the people on the other end of the phone line really can tell whether or not you’re smiling.

As another year winds down, the economy isn’t the only thing that’s in a slump. Plenty of workers are in the doldrums, too. They feel stuck in their jobs because new ones are hard to come by. They can’t afford to retire. So they’re not performing as well as employees who look at their jobs as labors of love. Here's how HR can help get them back on track.