Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Update your image by Botoxing your résumé, says Lisa Johnson Mandell, author of Career Comeback: Repackage Yourself to Get the Job You Want. Like the cosmetic procedure, Botoxing your résumé is a way to “lift, firm and freshen your look,” says Mandell.

You may know the difference between the two, but have you ever used one of these homonyms in place of the other? It’s easy enough to mistakenly type one when you meant the other—and not even spellcheck is likely to catch it.
With at least 10,000 hours of practice doing something complex, you can be excellent at it, according to "Six Keys to Being Excellent at Anything."
The EEOC has published its final regulations implementing Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA). They take effect on Jan. 10. The new regulations clarify when employers may be liable for acquiring genetic information.

“All first drafts are terrible. I don’t care if you’re Hemingway.” That comes from a writing professor who may as well have been talking about email. No email should be sent without revision. Here's an email etiquette checklist to follow:

Question: “I often feel like an outsider in my office. I am 61, overweight, and have gray hair. My co-workers are in their 20s and 30s. The whole group goes out for “happy hour” once every six weeks ... I usually avoid these get-togethers because I don’t feel comfortable with the youngsters ... Do you think I should start going?” — Old & Gray
In another example of the complex interplay between social media and HR, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) reached a settlement on Feb. 7, 2011, in the closely watched “Facebook Firing” case.
As CEO of one of the fastest-growing private companies, Bronto Software’s Joe Colopy says, “It’s hard to understand what it means to be a leader until you’re in a situation where it really matters.” For Colopy, the journey from entrepreneur to CEO has meant completely changing his game. His secrets to keeping employees informed:
If you’re like most people, the last thing you want to hear after you’ve finally worked up your nerve to ask for what you want is a big, fat no. Rejection isn’t fun. But rejection is a great time to take stock.

More than 20 million people have downloaded Bump, an application that allows people to bump their smartphones together to exchange contact information. But that doesn’t mean the end of business cards.