Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

Do you often text to communicate with colleagues or the boss? If so, keep your professionalism intact. Business communications trainer Barbara Pachter offers these suggestions for making texting suitable for business:
In theory, the word “ma’am” is a courtesy extended to women. But many women say it makes them cringe. In a recent poll by Survey Monkey, only two participants preferred the term “ma’am.” The best course of action? When in doubt, skip the courtesy term altogether.
Between vague agendas and never-ending PowerPoints, meetings have become a waste of time for many. Here’s how some “experts” structure their huddles to make them productive and run smoothly:

As people grapple with the urge to put things off, economists and psychologists have turned the study of procrastination into a significant field. And what have they discovered? Simply trying harder to “stop procrastinating” doesn’t work. Here’s what will:

Employers are emerging from the Great Recession with a different view of compensation and benefits. And, in most cases, that’s a good thing. Lessons learned in the lean years are being adapted and modified to make organizations stronger in this post-recession landscape. Look for these 11 trends to take a firm hold in 2011:

Sometimes, a general word isn’t clear enough when writing e-mail or other correspondence. Use defining words to make sure the reader clearly understands what you’re saying, advises Craig Hogan, author of Explicit Business Writing:
Employers are increasingly using web-based social media—such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter—to screen potential employees, in addition to the usual applications, interviews, references, and background, credit and drug tests. But they don’t always recognize the potential pitfalls and risks.

Staying on top of the administrative profession and your industry is a daunting task. Several tools can help with storing an article until later when you have spare time to read:

What’s the best way to get a job right now? Networking, according to a recent survey of HR execs by Challenger, Gray & Christmas. The best (and easiest) way to nurture your online network is through LinkedIn, the one social networking site you can’t ignore if you’re a professional. Here’s how to best use the web site:

Let your body language broadcast your confidence ... Keep track of your “must read” pile with Delicious.com. It’s a particularly useful tool for longer-term storage of important articles, and you can access it from any device ... On your résumé, list accomplishments, not just job duties.