Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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U.S. workers could use a little cheering up. We could all use less snark, more support in the workplace. What can you do about it?

A while back, Google set out to improve the skills of its managers. A bunch of statisticians compared correlations in the words and phrases that came up again and again in performance reviews, feedback surveys and recognition nominations.  The end result: a simple yet elegant list of eight things the best Google managers do:

Ken Anderson beat the odds to become one of the most prolific quarterbacks in National Football League history. Slow-footed quarterbacks with weak arms aren’t even supposed to make the NFL, much less lead the Cincinnati Bengals to the Super Bowl. How he did it:

It doesn’t hurt that accounting firm Grant Thornton offers flexible work schedules, commuter spending accounts, dependent care and an employee assistance program. But execs there attribute the organization’s culture of long-term retention to what they consider a family-like environment at their branch offices.

When you help someone by connecting them via an e-mail introduction, follow these three basic rules: 1. Be clear and up front about your motive. 2. Don’t copy all parties unless you are 100% positive the recipient will be open to the introduction. 3. Give the recipient an “out.”
If Nina Zagat knows anything, it’s how to have a successful business dinner. The co-founder of the Zagat Survey restaurant guides says the main goal of any meal with business colleagues is to leave the meal knowing more about who she is as a person. Other rules for business meals:
When making an e-mail introduction, don’t copy all parties unless you are 100% positive the recipient will be open to the introduction. Send the e-mail with your request, and include the other person’s contact information.

Prior to gathering anyone around the conference table, ask yourself or the meeting organizer this important question: “Why are we meeting?” The best meetings let groups do one of three things: brainstorm, solve a problem or make a decision. People need a more tangible goal than simply to “discuss” an issue or listen to progress reports.

Which are you more likely to write: “Do not waste energy” or “Conserve energy”? Using positive, self-assured, optimistic language is a better way to promote your ideas. In the above example, “Conserve energy” is more persuasive because it makes readers feel good rather than admonished. Here are 5 examples of negative sentences turned positive:

The slash or “/” is usually deployed when you need a quick and dirty way of saying “and” or “or.” Examples: “writer/director” and “and/or.” But, one reader asks, how do you make such phrases possessive?

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