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Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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Don’t read too much into the recent foray by the NLRB into the brave new world of social media. Employees don’t receive a free pass on social media posts. They don’t have license to defame, disparage or otherwise trash their company, management, product or co-workers. Until the NLRB says otherwise, employers shouldn’t treat social media any differently than any other form of employee communications.
Your software is sluggish; your gadgets are glitchy. Here are seven easy updates that will improve your technological life. For starters, get a smartphone—having instant access to your e-mail, calendars, address book, GPS and anything on the Internet will make your life easier.

One of your best weapons, when it comes to persuading others, is an adaptable communication style. Look out for these four styles of communicators, and adjust your approach when working with them:

Speaking up in meetings to ask for clarification can be intimidating. But it’s best to summon the courage, especially if you’re the one taking formal minutes or notes. Having a few useful phrases in hand can give you the confidence you need to speak up:
Returning home after a conference with a stack of books, handouts and notes leads to the inevitable question: Now what? Make sure your newly gained knowledge stays with you:
Audiences no longer sit quietly, absorbing a speaker’s words and images, waiting to ask a question or make a comment. Instead, they use Twitter to text in real-time, usually adding a specific hashtag to their tweets. Any tweet mentioning a particular hashtag is part of the “backchannel” conversation among attendees and speakers.
It’s all too easy to trip over these words: "literally," "myself" and "utlilize." For example:

Writers sometimes stumble over how to make words plural. Here are two tricky situations: 1. Family and brand names. 2. Decades and other numbers.

The next time you're ready to deliver a presentation, don't let nitty-gritty audio problems make you even more nervous before stepping up to the mike. You don't want to start the presentation with "Can you hear me now?" Set the stage to set off on the right note, by answering these questions:

If you think about it, the whole process of starting with learning the basics of any discipline and methodically working your way up to some level of mastery makes sense for undertakings far beyond Boy Scout merit badges.  It led me to consider, “If there were a merit badge for organizational leadership, what would the requirements be?”
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