Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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The Navy classified Larry Zeiger 4-F because of his bad eyes. His friends had all joined the service, so he was left behind, wandering aimlessly. The young man wanted to go into broadcasting. Zeiger finally landed a job as a radio disc jockey and a new name five minutes before the show: Larry King.

After you’ve done your homework and are about to speak, remind yourself that you’ve prepared to the best of your ability. This is no time for second-guessing. And keep this old fable in mind:
Three "C's" shape the way other people listen to us, says Susan Mason, of Vital Visions Consultants. If they think we possess competence, character and a can-do attitude, they'll find us credible, and they'll be more influenced by what we say.
I recently read an article in Inc. magazine about the “5 Qualities of Remarkable Bosses.”  As someone niched in training administrative professionals, I feel strongly about adapting these skills to grow everyone’s career.
If you worry that the personal habits and behavior of your employees—particularly new hires, fresh out of school—might be holding them back (and re­­flect­­ing poorly on your organization), try these tips for reinforcing business etiquette.
When you have to deliver bad news to someone, follow this protocol that medical doctors use to tell patients about dire prognoses:
When CNN ran a report in 2010 alleging pervasive bias in the Federal Air Marshal’s Service (FAMS), authorities braced for the worst. The good news: The resulting government investigation didn’t uncover widespread discrimination. The bad news: Investigators found that many FAMS employees believe they have been discriminated against.

When you hear "negotiation," what comes to mind? When I ask this question at seminars, women often respond: men in suits arguing and yelling; buying a car; attorneys. When I ask how many women enjoy negotiating, only a few hands go up. Yet in reality, women are born to negotiate.

In business writing, bullet points often replace regular old paragraphs, with good reason: Readers can scan them faster. Stick to these standards for using bullets effectively:

In 1975, producer Brian Eno and artist Peter Schmidt published a set of 100 cards each containing a single question or “brain bomb” to push them out of their mental rut.
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