Workplace Communication

In an era of Casual Fridays and work-from-home colleagues, how can you maintain effective office communication in a changing business climate?

We’ll steer you through changes in business etiquette, and help you successfully navigate through the new realities of workplace conflict and office politics.

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The Golden Globes often provide public speaking inspiration. However, Deborah Grayson Riegel, an expert in presentation and interpersonal communication skills, explains how the speeches fell short this year and offers advice we can all use:
Employees may complain to you that their jobs are too difficult. However, a little probing usually reveals they’re referring to stumbling blocks that, in total, constitute only a small part of their workdays.
If some employees work at home—even on a part-time basis—they may feel out of the loop and unmotivated at times. To keep those employees feeling connected and motivated, take these steps:
Stop feeling insecure about whether your speaking voice is too high or too low. Find your optimal pitch—or your natural speaking voice—by following this advice from Sandra Kazan, a voice and speech coach.
The next time an employee approaches you with a request, stop yourself from automatically replying, “We can’t do that!” Instead, ask yourself, “Can we do that?”
After you have wrapped up a presentation, show sincere interest in your audience’s feedback. Your listeners deserve your complete attention—after all, they just gave you theirs.
If you work with someone moody—whether a boss or a coworker—don’t just deal with the highs and lows of the person’s ever-fluctuating mood. Instead, find a way to safely talk about the problem.
Improve your department’s service performance by considering some of the ways you have been pleasantly surprised as a customer.
Severing professional ties with someone, especially an employee, can be as rough on the messenger as it is on the recipient. Take these business leaders’ advice to handle it as well as possible.
To help you and your colleagues stay consistent in your written communications, Bonnie Trenga Mills, author of The Curious Case of the Mis­­placed Modi­­fier, shares tips on how to make a style sheet for everyone’s reference.